nontheistic


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nontheistic

(ˌnɒnˌθiːˈɪstɪk)
adj
(Theology) theol of or pertaining to the views of a nontheist
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Stoicism's history of revising itself, that Stoics would have become as nontheistic as himself had they lived to read the works of David Hume and Charles Darwin.
First, government bodies must not discriminate based on religion in selecting people to deliver invocations, and they must permit people who do not believe in God to deliver nontheistic invocations.
On rereading Anselm's works, she claims to have discovered an entirely new theory not only to support theistic arguments for free will, but also to insert a new paradigm into nontheistic positions on the question.
But a majority of appeal judges disagreed, concluding that Real Alternatives is not similar to a religious denomination or one of its nontheistic counterparts, "not in structure, not in aim, not in purpose, and not in function.
How religion and spirituality are construed within these types of experiences will depend on the cultural realities of the counselor and client, and, indeed, there are at least four common configurations of these terms in the contemporary, English-speaking West: theistic, religious, nontheistic, and ethical (Ammerman, 2013, 2014).
There are also religions, like Buddhism, that are nontheistic.
The point here is not to question the reasonableness of the theory of evolution in general, but rather to question its reductionistic, nontheistic version.
s intercultural and interreligious credentials come to the fore as he explores diverse concepts, symbols, and images, from both theistic and nontheistic traditions, pointing to a singular ineffable mystery.
Because Buddhism is a nontheistic religion, Buddhists don't meet the "duty to God" criteria, either.
Marcia Falk in The Book of Blessings has translated certain Jewish blessings into a nontheistic form.
First, nontheistic naturalism and humanism figure more prominently in the history of Chinese religion than in the history of religion in the western world, although this has never been to the exclusion of theistic belief (Adler, 2002; Li, 2006; Lou, 2007; Zhou, 1985).
The EEOC definition encompasses not only traditional, organized religions, but any theistic and nontheistic moral or ethical beliefs, even if they are new, uncommon, not part of any formal organization, or followed by very few people.