nontheological

nontheological

(ˌnɒnˌθiːəˈlɒdʒɪkəl)
adj
(Theology) not theological, not having theological content
References in periodicals archive ?
(See the recent work of Mushegh Asatryan, for example.) Pierce notes that some ghulat ideas were incorporated in the biographies, but he argues that their inclusion was, in general, nontheological, alluding to the tolerance of contradiction that leads Ibn Shahrashub both to condemn the ghulat and, almost in the same breath, to quote ghulat stories "in which 'A1T is said to have flown through the air ...
(2) George Lindbeck, a Lutheran contemporary of Rahner, has argued that one's theological methodology must be able to "handle the anthropological, historical, and other nontheological [i.e., empirical or scientific] data better than do the alternatives" in order for it to be viable.
Among the few women lecturers found in the seminaries, a majority of them are recruited to teach nontheological subjects.
The pope has no privileged role in this nontheological
Also placed on the ecumenical agenda were so-called "nontheological" factors such as culture, class, race, and gender.
It would be decades before theologians, notably European, would regard nontheological factors as part of the agenda of Faith and Order, and not until 1968 when so-called nontheological factors such as racism and apartheid were recognized as profoundly theological and patently church-dividing.
Fichte's 1798 System of Ethics was seen, in the German-language philosophy of the first half of the nineteenth century, as the most important exemplar of systematic normative ethics on nontheological foundations.
though nontheological, case to the one I present here in his conflict of
Because--although Lewis does not put it this way in Abolition of Man, a decidedly nontheological piece of writing--human reason and desire are disordered by sin.
film & religion), this volume compiles essays from various authors with various religious backgrounds on religious themes in the work Joss Whedon, a self-described "angry atheist." Contributors give thorough attention to the superficially spiritual trappings and archetypal narratives of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel, as well as the treatment of religious characters such as Shepherd Book of Firefly, but issues of soul, feeling, consciousness, conversion and redemption are also drawn out of the relatively nontheological narratives of Dollhouse and The Avengers.
This is not to argue that the Anabaptist commitment to nonviolence is wholly explicable in terms of nontheological, socio-political pressures; in fact, the conception of communal discernment argued for here could aid in conversations about the origins of Anabaptist nonviolence, allowing one to acknowledge the emergence of this conviction (it did not drop from the sky, after all) while also recognizing its robustly theological and normative character.
William Stuntz's posthumously published work on criminal law draws upon related ideas in a nontheological context and might offer one of the best examples of "translation" in this difficult area of law.