nontonal

nontonal

(ˌnɒnˈtəʊnəl)
adj
(Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics (of a language) in which pitch does not play a role in distinguishing between words
References in periodicals archive ?
Irish folksongs are often metrically irregular or unmetered, unaccompanied, strophic, modal or nontonal, embellished with melismas, and composed to fit Gaelic texts.
More research could also address a question e-mailed by reader Nathan Meleen, who asks how speakers of tonai languages, which use changes in pitch to distinguish between otherwise identical words, might fare in identifying off-key crooning compared with speakers of nontonal languages.
Essays include discussion of new editing methods for transcribing the polyphonic Notre Dame conductus repertoire; John Bull's "Art of Canon" and plainsong-based counterpoint in the late Renaissance; the cognitive processes involved in music, drawing on Jung's eight cognitive processes; the sinfonias of Bach; basic formal structures in music; Wolf's "An eine Aolsharfe"; the teleological aspects of nontonal music; and satire in twentieth-century music by Mahler, Shostakovich, and Lebic.
Nibert (2005) offers as evidence the lack of transparency in the structure and meaning of intonation, and Ladd (2008) notes that the paralinguistic and emotion-based characteristics often associated with intonation cause many to see it as a nonlinguistic feature in nontonal languages.
Each of these pieces provide a unique glimpse into Hersch's musical style: "Nocturne," a sophisticated sound esthetic and linear control; "Little Spinning Song," the primacy of outer-voice counterpoint and its influence on the resulting nontonal harmonic progression; and, "Chorinho," a characteristic left-hand accompaniment and the role of invertible counterpoint in generating tuneful melodies.
In Korgbara, where the comparison was made between English, a familiar nontonal language (and one spoken by the listener), and Igbo, a previously unheard tonal language, it is uncertain that relevant language-independent cues were even available, let alone sufficient, to facilitate an identification with much probative value.
In spoken form, English is a nontonal language and its phonological characteristics are processed primarily by the left cerebral hemisphere of the brain (Lieberman, 2000).
On the basis of a considerable dataset, Rialland and Robert (2001) recently published an overview of the intonation of Wolof, a Niger-Congo language which is nontonal and has fixed stress.
In a discussion that draws examples from Powell's Setting for Guitar (1986), Anthony Kroyt Brandt calls pitch fields organized in this way Powell's "favored tableau type" and suggests that "the resultant structural 'resonance' is a nontonal analog of the resonance of octaves in tonal music.
The flavour of the ensuing chapters can be gleaned from their titles: 'Some General Aspects of Technique', 'Tonality and Tonal Structures', 'A New Aesthetic: Symmetry as a Basis of Structure', 'Scales: their Origins and Application', 'Bichords, Bitonality, and Polymodality', 'Constructional Principles', 'Sonata Forms', 'Sets and Other Nontonal Techniques'.
Strauss, like Bart6k and Schoenberg, took Wagner's extraordinary chromaticism and pushed it to expressive lengths, flirting with a nontonal universe that was little short of scandalous.
According to my findings, American musicians gave over seven hundred performances of tonal and nontonal works during his American years," writes Feisst (pp.