nontotalitarian

nontotalitarian

(ˌnɒntəʊˌtælɪˈtɛərɪən)
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) not totalitarian
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
One should not think that the development of a nontotalitarian state in a country, even a democratic one, shows that the danger of totalitarianism is over.
His way of inflecting the fundamental political term "community" (which becomes communitas in Esposito's philosophical vocabulary) suggests that the erasure of a supposedly primary and fixed identity from a (re)written text is consistent with the understanding of a nontotalitarian way of living together.
Russian literature is "the nontotalitarian consciousness's form of existence in Russia." It must be infused with "clarity" to repudiate the lies of the Soviet era, socialisms "lifeless, invented reality," and the "word corpses" of Russian television.
(13) Here, Eagleton follows in the footsteps of Hannah Arendt, who half a century ago brilliantly elucidated what she calls "the anti-utilitarian character of the totalitarian state structure." Arendt also clarifies why we struggle to accept this structure's fundamental purposelessness, arguing, "The reason why the totalitarian regimes can get so far toward realizing a fictitious, topsy-turvy world is that the outside nontotalitarian world [...] indulges [ .
is one, and possibly the most important, instrument of totalitarianism for dealing with the nontotalitarian world" (Arendt 1962: 344).
The American dream might still be incomplete, but the new wisdom seemed to be that the dream was destined to be completed in the multiethnic, nontotalitarian United States.
The extensive influence of a particular idea, Gramsci argued, operated not through the brute application of force in nontotalitarian societies, but by consent--a tacit, unwritten agreement often passed off as conventional wisdom or common sense.
So, Conant's objection to Rorty is not that the sort of social experiment he proposes is, as it were, too risky, but that the very idea of it as an "experiment" that might have democratically beneficial effects presupposes a very superficial conception of the difference between totalitarian and nontotalitarian societies.
The American republic has no place, intellectually or politically, in the pre-Enlightenment European world, and while Francis Fukuyama's "end of history" thesis is partially correct -- communism, at least outside of the halls of academe, does not offer a viable ideological threat to democracy -- what model of nontotalitarian governance will ultimately triumph globally is still very much in doubt.
In contrast, the nontotalitarian species of the genus are not implacably hostile to democracy and combine a staunch antiimperialism with an eagerness to engage the world on the basis of mutual respect and benefit.