nontrivial


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non·triv·i·al

 (nŏn-trĭv′ē-əl)
adj.
1. Not trivial; of some importance.
2. Mathematics Of, relating to, or being an expression in which at least one variable is not equal to zero.

nontrivial

(ˌnɒnˈtrɪvɪəl)
adj
not trivial; significant, important
References in periodicals archive ?
Increased regulation may even explain a nontrivial portion of the productivity slowdown observed in recent years, which has exacerbated the stagnation of wages.
For a nontrivial segment of the population, transgender is no longer a contested novelty; it is a taken-for-granted reality.
Rosembaum presents the concepts of causal inference with a minimum of technical material, treating difficult concepts by focusing on the simplest nontrivial case and omitting non-essential detail and generalization while presenting necessary background and introducing notation at a measured pace.
But it's a cafAaAaAe not a bar, and in that nontrivial difference lies the fundamental problem of European Jewish existence.
As linear categories, the bimodule categories in R are representations of semidirect factors of H (so they may be significantly "smaller", down to Vect) but with a largely nontrivial bimodule category structure (V.
Shimoda's claims are nontrivial, if a bit straightforward.
His explanations are engaging but not thorough (it's not a textbook), and while mostly accessible, his writing often assumes a nontrivial level of mathematical knowledge.
It's well known that every nontrivial solution of (1) is entire and of infinite order.
2](x) [equivalent to] 0, then (7) has a nontrivial integral I(x) = [x.
This is a nontrivial amount of time devoted to employment.
In contrast to surgical menopause, which is associated with an immediate and dramatic drop in estrogen levels, women undergoing natural menopause may be exposed to a nontrivial amount of total and unopposed estrogen during the menopausal transition," they wrote.
lambda]]) with p = 2 (semilinear equation) was investigated by Miyagaki-Souto [26], who established the existence of at least one nontrivial weak solution for all [lambda] > 0.