nontropical

nontropical

(ˌnɒnˈtrɒpɪkəl)
adj
(Physical Geography) not located in or originating from the tropics, not having the characteristics of the tropics
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References in periodicals archive ?
Choose a diet that emphasizes intake of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains; includes low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish, legumes, nontropical vegetable oils, and nuts; and limits intake of sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages, and red meats.
"The strongest nontropical storms like the 'bomb cyclone' from last winter develop clear areas at center similar to tropical systems."
A morphological and histochemical analysis of the normal human jejunal epithelium in nontropical sprue.
Few data, beyond anecdotal clinician reports, exist on tropical splenomegaly, and patients' anticipated clinical course is still largely unknown, particularly after relocation to nontropical environments.
In addition, clinicians should be aware that similar clinical presentations might also be increasingly observed in nontropical settings.
Among indirect non-pulmonary nontropical causes sepsis was the most common, causing acute ARDS in 10 (12.5%) patients.
(5) Of the exports in this category 43 percent of the value comes from nonconiferous (tropical) and 45 percent from nonconiferous (nontropical).
Hyne, "Comparison of environmental risks of pesticides between tropical and nontropical regions," Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management, vol.
Laffon, "Nontropical pyomyositis in adults," Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism, vol.
The nontropical climate also impeded cultivation of the kinds crops that tropical American colonies like the Bahamas sent to Europe (with the exception of southern cotton).
Background: Celiac disease (CD) (also called gluten-sensitive enteropathy and nontropical sprue) is a known entity since 1888, is a common immune-mediated enteropathy due to allergy to gluten, with a prevalence of approximately 1% worldwide.
Poplars, and their buds in particular, are considered the main indirect source of propolis in Europe and North America, nontropical Asia, New Zealand, and North Africa (especially the Nile delta) [100].