nonviewer

nonviewer

(ˌnɒnˈvjuːə)
n
a person who does not watch (television)
References in periodicals archive ?
But, for a nonviewer, while the shout-singing is frustrating enough, it's the nearconstant river of tears demanded from the empty-headed contestants that really confused me.
note, however, that "[e]mpirical study of the CSI effect is in its infancy and the results are mixed"; while one study "found that undergraduate students who watched CSI were more critical of forensic evidence than their nonviewer colleagues," another found no significant relationship between viewing CSI and treatment of forensic evidence.
1980) The <<scary world>> of the nonviewer and other anomalies, Communication Research, 7, 403-456.
21) For example, each entry in column 3 is an estimate of the difference between the messages received by a regular viewer of the network news and a nonviewer between February and September.
The scary world of the nonviewer and other anomalies: A reanalysis of Gerbner et al.
The `Scary World' of the Nonviewer and Other Anomalies: A Reanalysis of Gerbner et al.
81 times more likely to purchase than nonviewers, she points out.
It was also recommended to research why nonviewers did not watch Farmweek.
Preschoolers who watched Sesame Street read more books and outperformed nonviewers on English, science, and math in high school (Huston, Anderson, Wright, Linebarger, & Schmitt, 2001).
However, while you can ingest this content from your social media accounts, there's no way within the program to push images or videos out to social media, which is a nice way to keep your viewers (and nonviewers you're hoping to convert to viewers) engaged.
In an important series of studies, Danna Young finds that TDS viewers consume more news than do nonviewers (Young & Tisinger, 2006) and pay more attention to political campaigns (Feldman & Young, 2008).
As another example, while Schweitzer and Saks (2007) found a nonsignificant difference in verdict preference in the hypothesized direction between forensic science television viewers and nonviewers in response to a trial transcript, they found that viewers rendered a higher self-perception of understanding of the tasks that forensic scientists perform as well as a lower rating of the believability of the presented pro-prosecution scientific evidence.