nonvoter


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non·vot·er

 (nŏn-vō′tər)
n.
A person who does not vote or has no right to vote.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

nonvoter

(nɒnˈvəʊtə)
n
1. a person who does not vote
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person not eligible to vote
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
In their view, a leading culprit is the American nonvoter.
There are five characteristic variables in each equation estimated: a dummy for voting bank presidents (BPVOTER), a dummy for nonvoting bank presidents (NonVOTER), and interaction terms between TRANSCRIPT and these dummy variables (Trans*BPVOTER and Trans*NonVOTER).
I've finally become what I've threatened to become for years--a nonvoter. I've concluded that a vote for anyone is nothing more than a vote for a system where power-hungry politicians and greedy lobbyists wreck our future for their own self-interest.
But the bulk of the book is devoted to showing that there is no stereotypical nonvoter. While most nonvoters are -- as research and common sense suggest -- poorer, younger, and less educated than voters, there are those who are highly educated, wealthy; and older.
The short end of the curve has been unable to take advantage of some flight to quality flows, and instead remains encumbered by the hawkish Fed policy tilt, especially after Rosengren (a nonvoter) advocated for more than 3 tightenings this year.
St Louis Fed's Bullard (nonvoter) speaks on monetary policy and the economy.
Fedspeak has Williams (a voter this year) and Kaplan (a nonvoter).
Minneapolis Fed dove Kashkari (nonvoter) gives his outlook on the regional economy (Tuesday).
The crucial assumption of the given method is that the relationship between the socioeconomic variables used as predictors and vote choice is the same for voters and nonvoters. Thus, in a multinomial logistic model, we regress vote choice for observed voters, and use these coefficients to predict the probabilities that nonvoters would vote for party i, meaning that our estimated likelihood for non-voters is a function of nonvoters characteristics and the estimated parameters of voters:
If you think of every election as a celebration of democracy, sending nonvoters a simple "We missed you" card could bring more of them to the next party.
You know the unofficial rules: Nonvoters don't count.