nonwoody


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nonwoody

(ˌnɒnˈwʊdɪ)
adj
(Botany) not woody; not resembling or consisting of wood
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.nonwoody - not woody; not consisting of or resembling wood
woody - made of or containing or resembling wood; "woody plants"; "perennial herbs with woody stems"; "a woody taste"
References in periodicals archive ?
Depithing, resin impregnation and chemical/thermal treatment of nonwoody fibers (12), (13) and newer type of adhesives with adequate bonding capability (14-17) can provide composite panels with acceptable properties as required by the industry and users.
Data for all nonwoody resources, fuels, and transportation were from the US Life-Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database (US LCI 2012).
Nonwoody plants included marsh buttercup (Ranunculus septentrionalis), blue flag (Iris hexagona), brookweed (Samolus valerandii), marsh purslane (Ludwigia palustris), warty arrowhead (Sagittaria papillosa), stingless nettle (Boehmeria cylindrica), large spikerush (Eleocharis macrostachya), turgid sedge (Carex amphibola), and basket grass (Oplismenus hirtellus).
You can keep nonwoody annuals and perennials flowering by using two simple techniques.
Fences and decks would be made of nonwoody materials.
The continued decline of nonwoody pollen types (NAP) and the sharp decrease in percentage and APF of aquatic types may represent both a drier, warmer climate and reduction in the extent of unforested, marshy, and open water habitats in the vicinity of the Heisler mastodon site.
However, in the gardening trade it is most often used to describe herbaceous plants - those whose nonwoody top growth dies back to the soil surface, where the plant remains dormant during the winter months only to re-emerge each year in the spring.
They dine on tree phloem - the inner bark, nonwoody vascular tissue - adding dozens of chambers to the egg gallery.
These nonwoody plants that emerge in the spring and die by fall range from tiny campanulas an inch tall to soaring spires of giant delphiniums reaching four to five feet.