nonworker


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nonworker

(ˌnɒnˈwɜːkə)
n
a person who is not engaged in paid employment
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nonworker - a person who does nothing
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
deadhead - a nonenterprising person who is not paying his way; "the deadheads on the payroll should be eased out as fast as possible"
do-nothing, idler, layabout, loafer, bum - person who does no work; "a lazy bum"
retired person, retiree - someone who has retired from active working
striker - an employee on strike against an employer
unemployed person - someone who is jobless
vacationer, vacationist - someone on vacation; someone who is devoting time to pleasure or relaxation rather than to work
worker - a person who works at a specific occupation; "he is a good worker"
References in periodicals archive ?
1989-1992 Total 4,152 Nonworker 1,035 Under 25 772 25-99 886 100-499 577 500-999 23 1,000 or More 859 1991-1992 Total 2,211 Nonworker 437 Under 25 937 25-99 339 100-499 273 500-999 218 1,000 or More 6 Note: Table made from bar graph.
Table 1: Distribution of the occupational status and educational level of the cases Experimental Control Total, P (*) group, n (%) group, n (%) n (%) Occupational status Nonworker 13 (52.0) 11 (47.8) 24 (50.0) 0.959 Professional 8 (32.0) 8 (34.8) 16 (33.3) worker Currently 4(16.0) 4 (17.4) 8 (16.7) unemployed Educational level Primary school 8 (32.0) 8 (34.8) 16 (33.3) 0.977 High school 10 (40.0) 9 (39.1) 19 (39.6) College 7 (28.0) 6 (26.1) 13 (27.1) Total 25 23 48 (100.0) (*) Pearson's Chi-square analysis.
The $3 (P134) per day a Vietnamese worker gets is much too low, but it's better than the zero a Filipino nonworker gets.
Other studies in nonworker populations have shown that use of early imaging may be associated with higher utilization and medical costs (Jarvik et al.
The risk factor of a worker's compensation claim was associated with a worse response on eight questions and a better response on one question compared to nonworker's compensation patients.
Disablement generally equates with poverty so becoming a nonworker translates into a life of financial hardship, whether one has insurance or not, and generates a very realistic fear in workers of becoming disabled.
Dobson's introduction acknowledges the difficulties with the terms worker and nonworker, but gives a refreshingly frank case for their use in his study that is borne out by the rest of the book.
With this approach, a particular nonworker may or may not overreport disability, and the degree of overreporting may depend on factors other than the desire to work.
The United States, for instance, offers many examples of nonworker influence on unions.
(%); N = 302 Male sex * 262 (87) Age group, y ([dagger]) 0-9 1 (<1 10-19 16 (5) 20-29 67 (22) 30-39 47 (16) 40-49 68 (23) 50-59 53 (18) 60-69 30 (10) [greater than or equal to] 70 18 (6) Occupation ([double dagger]) Farmer or farm worker 173 (60) Animal health worker 37 (13) Abattoir worker, butcher, or hunter 32 (11) Farm resident (nonworker) 5 (2) Non-animal related occupation 42 (15) * Known for 302 case-patients.
TABLE 2 Frequency of Pantry Visits by Employment Status, Among Single Mothers Using Food Pantries in Wisconsin During October 1999 (n=868) Long-term Medium-term Nonworker Nonworker (> 12 months) (3-12 months) (%) (%) Percent of Sample in Category 23 15 Visits to Any Food Pantry in Past 6 Months * 1 (New User) 16 21 2-3 (Light User) 22 24 4-6 (Moderate User) 24 23 7+ (Heavy User) 38 33 Total 100 100 Recently Out of Work (0-2 months) Employed (%) (%) Percent of Sample in Category 15 47 Visits to Any Food Pantry in Past 6 Months * 1 (New User) 31 20 2-3 (Light User) 38 30 4-6 (Moderate User) 14 21 7+ (Heavy User) 17 29 Total 100 100 * Indicates number of pantry visits differs significantly among employment groups at 1% confidence level, based on chi-square test.
A couple in which only one has a work history might receive $22,500 --$15,000 for the worker, and $7,500 for the nonworker. When one dies, the survivor will receive $15,000, a $7,500 decline.