norm


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norm

 (nôrm)
n.
1.
a. A pattern that is regarded as typical of something: a neighborhood where families with two wage-earners are the norm.
b. A standard or expectation that is established for a given enterprise or effort: journalistic norms.
c. A pattern of behavior considered acceptable or proper by a social group: violated the norms of his community.
2. Mathematics
a. An average.
b. The magnitude of a vector.
c. The modulus of a complex number.
tr.v. normed, norm·ing, norms
1. To establish or judge in reference to a norm: normed the test on the basis of last year's results.
2. Mathematics To define a norm on (a space).

[French norme, from Old French, from Latin norma, carpenter's square, norm; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

norm

(nɔːm)
n
1. an average level of achievement or performance, as of a group or person
2. a standard of achievement or behaviour that is required, desired, or designated as normal
3. (Sociology) sociol an established standard of behaviour shared by members of a social group to which each member is expected to conform
4. (Mathematics) maths
a. the length of a vector expressed as the square root of the sum of the square of its components
b. another name for mode6
5. (Geological Science) geology the theoretical standard mineral composition of an igneous rock
[C19: from Latin norma carpenter's rule, square]

Norm

(nɔːm)
n
a stereotype of the unathletic Australian male
[from a cartoon figure in the government-sponsored Life, Be In It campaign]

norm

(nɔrm)

n.
1. a standard, model, or pattern.
2. a rule or standard of behavior expected of each member of a social group.
3. a behavior pattern or trait considered typical of a particular social group.
4. the general level or average.
5. Educ.
a. a designated standard of average performance of people of a given age, background, etc.
b. a standard based on the past average performance of a given individual.
6. Math.
a. a real-valued, nonnegative function whose domain is a vector space.
b. the greatest difference between two successive points of a given partition.
[1815–25; < Latin normarule, pattern]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.norm - a standard or model or pattern regarded as typical; "the current middle-class norm of two children per family"
criterion, standard, touchstone, measure - a basis for comparison; a reference point against which other things can be evaluated; "the schools comply with federal standards"; "they set the measure for all subsequent work"
2.norm - a statistic describing the location of a distribution; "it set the norm for American homes"
statistics - a branch of applied mathematics concerned with the collection and interpretation of quantitative data and the use of probability theory to estimate population parameters
statistic - a datum that can be represented numerically
age norm - the average age at which particular performances are expected to appear
modal value, mode - the most frequent value of a random variable
median, median value - the value below which 50% of the cases fall
mean, mean value - an average of n numbers computed by adding some function of the numbers and dividing by some function of n

norm

noun standard, rule, model, pattern, mean, type, measure, average, par, criterion, benchmark, yardstick Their actions departed from what she called the commonly accepted norms of behaviour.
the norm the rule, the average, par for the course, the usual thing Families of six or seven were the norm in those days.

norm

noun
1. A regular or customary matter, condition, or course of events:
2. Something, as a type, number, quantity, or degree, that represents a midpoint between extremes on a scale of valuation:
Translations
norma
norm
norma
norm
норма

norm

[nɔːm] N
1. (= pattern of behaviour, official standard) → norma f
in the West monogamy is the normla monogamia es la norma en Occidente
small families have become the normlas familias pequeñas han pasado a ser lo normal
2. (= average) the normlo normal
larger than the normmás grande de lo normal (Bio) → más grande que el tipo

norm

[ˈnɔːrm] n
(= standard) → norme f
(= usual) to be the norm → être la règle
Working wives were the norm throughout the Soviet era → En URSS, il était de règle que les femmes travaillent.

norm

nNorm f; our norm is …unsere Norm liegt bei

norm

[nɔːm] nnorma

norm

n. norma, regla.

norm

n norma
References in classic literature ?
The stranger had sojourned in many more lands and among many more peoples than Angel; to his cosmopolitan mind such deviations from the social norm, so immense to domesticity, were no more than are the irregularities of vale and mountain-chain to the whole terrestrial curve.
Norm --Roger de Conde asks permission of no man to do what he would do.
The first project was, to shorten discourse, by cutting polysyllables into one, and leaving out verbs and participles, because, in reality, all things imaginable are but norms.
Still, for Norm and my father, it had been a terror-filled never-to-be-forgotten experience.
When the owner is no longer able to cope with their pets or they are moved into a home which does not allow pets, they are then separated, as was the case for ten-year-old Norm.
The author defines a social norm as a regularity in behavior whose persistence is causally explained by the existence of sanctioning attitudes of participants toward violations--without these sanctions, individuals have motive to violate the norm.
Militaries, therefore, should support domestic and international initiatives to shape operational norms of behavior, and they should lend their expertise to norm development efforts.
It was then that Sterling learned that Norm was diagnosed with early-onset dementia.
Although the most well-known norm theories include the theory of reasoned action (TRA; Fishbein & Ajzen, 1975), the theory of planned behavior (TPB; Ajzen, 1991), the focus theory of normative conduct (Cialdini, Reno, & Kallgren, 1990), the social norms approach (SNA; Berkowitz, 2005; Perkins, 2003), and the theory of normative social behavior (TNSB; Rimal & Real 2005; Rimal, 2008), one of the initial goals of this content analysis was to determine the extent to which each of these theories has been used.
According to norm theory, norms do not arise spontaneously and arbitrarily but evolve through a sequence of stages, each characterized by a set of elements.
fiduciary norm calls for thereby fails to live up to that norm, no
Keywords: sustainable development, international norms, norm life cycle.