notation

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no·ta·tion

 (nō-tā′shən)
n.
1.
a. A system of figures or symbols used in a specialized field to represent numbers, quantities, tones, or values: musical notation.
b. The act or process of using such a system.
2. A brief note; an annotation: marginal notations.

[Latin notātiō, notātiōn-, from notātus, past participle of notāre, to note, from nota, note; see note.]

no·ta′tion·al adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

notation

(nəʊˈteɪʃən)
n
1. any series of signs or symbols used to represent quantities or elements in a specialized system, such as music or mathematics
2. the act or process of notating
3.
a. the act of noting down
b. a note or record
[C16: from Latin notātiō a marking, from notāre to note]
noˈtational adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

no•ta•tion

(noʊˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a system of graphic symbols or signs for a specialized use: musical notation.
2. the process or method of writing down by means of such a system.
3. the act of noting or marking down in writing.
4. a short note; jotting; annotation.
[1560–70; < Latin notātiō a marking <notā(re) to note]
no•ta′tion•al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.notation - a technical system of symbols used to represent special thingsnotation - a technical system of symbols used to represent special things
writing - letters or symbols that are written or imprinted on a surface to represent the sounds or words of a language; "he turned the paper over so the writing wouldn't show"; "the doctor's writing was illegible"
mathematical notation - a notation used by mathematicians
musical notation - (music) notation used by musicians
choreography - a notation used by choreographers
chemical notation - a notation used by chemists to express technical facts in chemistry
2.notation - a comment or instruction (usually added); "his notes were appended at the end of the article"; "he added a short notation to the address on the envelope"
poste restante - a notation written on mail that is to be held at the post office until called for (not in the United States or Canada)
commentary, comment - a written explanation or criticism or illustration that is added to a book or other textual material; "he wrote an extended comment on the proposal"
cite, quotation, reference, mention, acknowledgment, citation, credit - a short note recognizing a source of information or of a quoted passage; "the student's essay failed to list several important citations"; "the acknowledgments are usually printed at the front of a book"; "the article includes mention of similar clinical cases"
footnote, footer - a printed note placed below the text on a printed page
N.B., nota bene, NB - a Latin phrase (or its abbreviation) used to indicate that special attention should be paid to something; "the margins of his book were generously supplied with pencilled NBs"
postscript, PS - a note appended to a letter after the signature
3.notation - the activity of representing something by a special system of marks or characters
committal to writing, writing - the activity of putting something in written form; "she did the thinking while he did the writing"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

notation

noun
1. signs, system, characters, code, symbols, script The dot in musical notation symbolizes an abrupt or staccato quality.
2. note, record, noting, jotting He was checking the readings and making notations on a clipboard.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

notation

noun
A brief record written as an aid to the memory:
Informal: memo.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
záznam
tegnsystem
jelölési rendszer
táknun; nótnaskrift, nótur
ženklų sistemažymėjimas ženklais
notssimbolszīme
harflernotaözel işaretleryazım

notation

[nəʊˈteɪʃən] N (Math, Mus) → notación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

notation

[nəʊˈteɪʃən] nnotation f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

notation

n
(= system)Zeichensystem nt, → Notation f (spec); (= symbols)Zeichen pl; (Mus) → Notenschrift f, → Notation f; (Math, Comput) → Notation f
(= note)Notiz f, → Anmerkung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

notation

[nəʊˈteɪʃn] nnotazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

notation

(nəˈteiʃən) noun
(the use of) a system of signs representing numbers, musical sounds etc. musical/mathematical notation.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
When these constructions combine, they form complex constructions (Langacker 2013: 15), which are represented as in (2b), and which can be simplified notationally as in (2c).
Notationally, the Michaelis-Menten growth trajectory of the number of frequent submissions according to the total number of submissions can be written as:
As the formal definition is a bit notationally heavy, it is relegated to Appendix A2.
We do not distinguish notationally between the matrix A [member of] [C.sup.n x n] as6 an operator on [C.sup.n,] i.e., v [right arrow] Av, and A as an operator on [C.sup.n x s,] i.e., V = [[v.sub.1] |...| [v.sub.s]| [right arrow] AV = [A[v.sub.1] | ...
Notationally, if [S.sub.1], [S.sub.2], ..., [S.sub.n] are sets of vertices, then their Cartesian product is the set [S.sub.1] x [S.sub.2] x ...
Throughout this section, let A be a unital associative ring and B [??] A a subring where [1.sub.B] = [I.sub.A]; more generally, it suffices to assume B [right arrow] A is a unital ring homomorphism, called a ring extension, although we suppress this option notationally. Note the natural bimodules [.sub.B][A.sub.B] obtained by restriction of the natural A-A-bimodule (briefly A-bimodule) A, also to the natural bimodules [.sub.B][A.sub.A], [.sub.A][A.sub.B] or [.sub.B][A.sub.B], which are referred to with no further ado.
Meanwhile, the two outer sections are only notationally in the same key of G major.
Notationally, this will be of the form shown in equations (6), (7), and (8).
Because this is notationally cumbersome, I omit the formal details.
It would be beneficial to have additional techniques that can be developed and acquired to ease the transition into note reading for any music ensemble setting but most importantly, specific to the notationally dense music that handbell ringers have to read.
Did Faure decide it was too notationally complex or cumbersome, or did the copyist or engraver just overlook it?