noteworthy

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note·wor·thy

 (nōt′wûr′thē)
adj. note·wor·thi·er, note·wor·thi·est
Deserving notice or attention; notable; remarkable: a noteworthy advance in cancer research.

note′wor′thi·ly adv.
note′wor′thi·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

noteworthy

(ˈnəʊtˌwɜːðɪ)
adj
worthy of notice; notable
ˈnoteˌworthily adv
ˈnoteˌworthiness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

note•wor•thy

(ˈnoʊtˌwɜr ði)

adj.
worthy of notice or attention; notable; remarkable: a noteworthy addition to the library.
[1545–55]
note′wor`thi•ly, adv.
note′wor`thi•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.noteworthy - worthy of notice; "a noteworthy advance in cancer research"
worthy - having worth or merit or value; being honorable or admirable; "a worthy fellow"; "a worthy cause"
2.noteworthy - worthy of notice; "a noteworthy fact is that her students rarely complain"; "a remarkable achievement"
significant, important - important in effect or meaning; "a significant change in tax laws"; "a significant change in the Constitution"; "a significant contribution"; "significant details"; "statistically significant"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

noteworthy

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
جَدير بالذِّكْر أو المُلاحَظَه
pozoruhodný
bemærkelsesværdig
athyglisverîur

noteworthy

[ˈnəʊtˌwɜːðɪ] ADJnotable, digno de atención
it is noteworthy thates notable que ..., es de notar que ...
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

noteworthy

[ˈnəʊtwɜːrði] adjremarquable
it is noteworthy that ... → il est à noter que ...
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

noteworthy

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

noteworthy

[ˈnəʊtˌwɜːðɪ] adjdegno/a di nota, importante
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

note

(nəut) noun
1. a piece of writing to call attention to something. He left me a note about the meeting.
2. (in plural) ideas for a speech, details from a lecture etc written down in short form. The students took notes on the professor's lecture.
3. a written or mental record. Have you kept a note of his name?
4. a short explanation. There is a note at the bottom of the page about that difficult word.
5. a short letter. She wrote a note to her friend.
6. (American bill) a piece of paper used as money; a bank-note. a five-dollar note.
7. a musical sound. The song ended on a high note.
8. a written or printed symbol representing a musical note.
9. an impression or feeling. The conference ended on a note of hope.
verb
1. (often with down) to write down. He noted (down) her telephone number in his diary.
2. to notice; to be aware of. He noted a change in her behaviour.
ˈnotable adjective
worth taking notice of; important. There were several notable people at the meeting.
ˌnotaˈbility noun
ˈnotably adverb
1. in particular. Several people offered to help, notably Mrs Brown.
2. in a noticeable way. Her behaviour was notably different from usual.
ˈnoted adjective
well-known. a noted author; This town is noted for its cathedral.
ˈnotelet (-lit) noun
a small piece of notepaper, often folded like a card and with a picture on it, used for short letters.
ˈnotebook noun
a small book in which to write notes.
ˈnotecase noun
a case for bank-notes, carried in the pocket.
ˈnotepaper noun
paper for writing letters.
ˈnoteworthy adjective
worthy of notice; remarkable.
ˈnoteworthiness noun
take note of
to notice and remember. He took note of the change in her appearance.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Noteworthily, temperature-responsive polymers are the most appealing and well-studied ones in the area of stimuli-responsive polymers [1, 14-16].
Noteworthily, in these instances the trope is in the vernacular.
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Noteworthily, [S.sup.(A).sub.eff] is composed of the matter's entropy and the dark energy's entropy.
Noteworthily, the two other species that have been previously described as belonging to the genus Wolbachia [25]: Wolbachia melophagi and Wolbachia persica were removed latter on [26].
Noteworthily, the micrometer size microbubbles would be limited within the blood lumen, which are quite suitable for applications to the intravasculature biomarkers.
Noteworthily, the differences of these two major organic acids (citric acid and malic acid) among all umezu samples were significant (p < 0.05).
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Noteworthily, hypertension was not present either at stage 3 of CKD (at the time of diagnosis) or when the patient entered dialysis.
Noteworthily, the gait periods of all participants are consistent after the normalization of various gait cycles.
Noteworthily, when we compared "ATGTACGCAA" (the most frequent haplotype) with "ATGTACGCGA" (the haplotype that was associated with LTBI risk in LTBI cases vs.
Noteworthily, the greatest majority of T2D cases are associated with two or more genetic mutations (polygenic nature), such alterations that in most cases increase the propensity, but are not sufficient to induce disease development without the contribution of environmental and/or behavioral factors.