notochord


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no·to·chord

 (nō′tə-kôrd′)
n.
A flexible rodlike structure that is present in the embryos of all chordates and in the adult forms of certain groups, such as the lancelets and hagfishes. The notochord develops into the spinal column in most vertebrates.

[Greek nōton, back + chord.]

no′to·chord′al adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

notochord

(ˈnəʊtəˌkɔːd)
n
(Zoology) a fibrous longitudinal rod in all embryo and some adult chordate animals, immediately above the gut, that supports the body. It is replaced in adult vertebrates by the vertebral column
ˌnotoˈchordal adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

no•to•chord

(ˈnoʊ təˌkɔrd)

n.
a long, flexible, rod-shaped structure that supports the vertical axis of the body in chordates and vertebrate embryos, in the latter developing into the spinal column.
[1840–50; < Greek nôt(on) the back + Greek chordḗ cord]
no`to•chord′al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

no·to·chord

(nō′tə-kôrd′)
A flexible rod-like structure that forms the main support of the body in the embryos of vertebrate animals, later developing into a true backbone. Primitive relatives of the vertebrates, known as lancelets and tunicates, only have a notochord and never develop a backbone. Animals having a notochord during some stage of their development are called chordates.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.notochord - a flexible rodlike structure that forms the supporting axis of the body in the lowest chordates and lowest vertebrates and in embryos of higher vertebratesnotochord - a flexible rodlike structure that forms the supporting axis of the body in the lowest chordates and lowest vertebrates and in embryos of higher vertebrates
urochord - a notochord of a larval tunicate typically confined to the caudal region
spinal column, spine, vertebral column, rachis, backbone, back - the series of vertebrae forming the axis of the skeleton and protecting the spinal cord; "the fall broke his back"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

no·to·chord

n. notocordio, sostén fibrocelular del embrión que se convierte más tarde en la columna vertebral.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It is characterized by the presence of a 45[degrees] upward turn of the notochord tip.
To obtain the hatching rate of 1.5 L incubators, all unviable eggs and larvae were removed and counted to determined the percentage of: normal larvae (regular movement); abnormal larvae (movement disabilities or abnormal notochord); dead larvae (hatched larvae that were dead at the moment of counts); unviable eggs, non hatched larvae (incompletely hatched larvae that were alive during counts) and non hatched dead larvae (incompletely hatched larvae that were dead during counts).
Common Dysmorphology Terminology Clinical Sign Definition Butterfly vertebrae Congenital failure of fusion of the lateral halves of the vertebral body due to persistent notochord tissue, giving the appearance of a butterfly on X-ray.
Type 1, in which not only the caudal tail bud is affected, but also part of the true notochord fails to develop (interference with both primary and secondary neurulation).
Notochord was the only axial structure at the lengths between 2.23 mm to 3.21 mm (1-9 DPH, Fig.
Setton and her group backtracked, devising a series of steps to first produce one of the earliest-forming embryonic structures, the notochord. In humans, the notochord is a cartilage-like rod that turns into the spinal column during in-vitro development.
Chordomas are uncommon neoplasms that originate from embryonic remnants of notochord and account for only 1-4% of all bone tumors.
The most accepted theory "split notochord syndrome" postulated the abnormal separation of the notochord from the endoderm, leading to enteric duplications [10].
The split notochord theory proposes a neural tube traction mechanism as an explanation for the 15% of enteric duplications associated with vertebral defects.
The [L.sub.s] was measured from the tip of the snout, horizontally, to the posterior tip of the notochord at the hypural plate, while [L.sub.T]was measured from the tip of the snout, horizontally, to the tip of the depressed caudal fin (Hubbs et al.
Among them, epidural lipomatosis usually occurs in obese people, patients with a history of corticosteroid use, and those with an endocrinopathy.[2] The Kovalevsky or neurenteric canal is defined as a canal connecting the neural tube and archenteron in the embryo, resulting from a persisting abnormal communication between the notochord and yolk sac and the amnion during an early stage of embryonic development.
The prenatal face and brain, both stem from the same layer of the notochord, the ectoderm, and both structures occur within a very close time span of one another (Donovan-Lepore et al., 2006), finding that the face is essentially supported by the growing brain which undergoes extensive morphogenetic changes (Diewert & Lozanoff, 1993).