notoriety


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notoriety

shame; infamy; disrepute; known widely and unfavorably: The extensive news coverage of his trial for murdering his wife brought him notoriety.
Not to be confused with:
fame – widespread reputation, esp. of a favorable character; renown; public eminence: His fame as a writer grew with each novel he wrote.
notability – distinction, prominence: She is a doctor of great notability.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

no·to·ri·e·ty

 (nō′tə-rī′ĭ-tē)
n.
The quality or condition of being notorious. See Usage Note at notorious.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

no•to•ri•e•ty

(ˌnoʊ təˈraɪ ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state or quality of being notorious.
2. Chiefly Brit. a notorious person.
[1585–95; < Medieval Latin nōtōrietās <nōtōri(us) notorious]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.notoriety - the state of being known for some unfavorable act or quality
infamy - evil fame or public reputation
reputation - notoriety for some particular characteristic; "his reputation for promiscuity"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

notoriety

noun infamy, discredit, disrepute, dishonour, bad reputation, opprobrium, ill repute, obloquy The team's fans have acquired notoriety as being among the worst hooligans in the country.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

notoriety

noun
1. Unfavorable, usually unsavory renown:
2. Wide recognition for one's deeds:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
شُهْرَة ٌبِسوء السُّمْعَه
notoričnost
berygtethed
hírhedtségközismertség
illur orîstír, óorî
notorickosť
dile düşmüşlükkötü şöhret

notoriety

[ˌnəʊtəˈraɪətɪ] Nmala fama f, mala reputación f
to achieve or gain notorietyadquirir mala fama or reputación
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

notoriety

[ˌnəʊtəˈraɪəti] nnotoriété f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

notoriety

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

notoriety

[ˌnəʊtəˈraɪətɪ] nnotorietà
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

notorious

(nəˈtoːriəs) adjective
well-known for badness or wickedness. a notorious murderer.
notoriety (noutəˈraiəti) noun
noˈtoriously adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The credit of the former is by common notoriety supported for a long time; and public records, with the concurrent testimony of many authors, bear evidence to their truth in future ages.
Father Mapple enjoyed such a wide reputation for sincerity and sanctity, that I could not suspect him of courting notoriety by any mere tricks of the stage.
I am what is termed a popular preacher--but I have never, in my secret self, felt any exultation in my own notoriety, or any extraordinary respect for the means by which it has been won.
This event made Fuchs the object of undeserved notoriety, since he was travelling with her.
And as there would be a necessity for submitting each nomination to the judgment of an entire branch of the legislature, the circumstances attending an appointment, from the mode of conducting it, would naturally become matters of notoriety; and the public would be at no loss to determine what part had been performed by the different actors.
And when such as had come in contact with Strickland in the past, writers who had known him in London, painters who had met him in the cafes of Montmartre, discovered to their amazement that where they had seen but an unsuccessful artist, like another, authentic genius had rubbed shoulders with them there began to appear in the magazines of France and America a succession of articles, the reminiscences of one, the appreciation of another, which added to Strickland's notoriety, and fed without satisfying the curiosity of the public.
But no one knows so well as the Secretary, who opens and reads the letters, what a set is made at the man marked by a stroke of notoriety. Oh the varieties of dust for ocular use, offered in exchange for the gold dust of the Golden Dustman!
The first person I asked gave me more in reply than I sought to know; he showed me the house, and told me all that had occurred at the betrothal of the daughter of the family, an affair of such notoriety in the city that it was the talk of every knot of idlers in the street.
But still more, this craving for notoriety was a symptom of the intense morbidness which now pervaded his nature.
Nevertheless, in view of the world-wide notoriety which attended it, I have been asked, both by my friend Poirot and the family themselves, to write an account of the whole story.
Of course I was all the talk -- all other subjects were dropped; even the king became suddenly a per- son of minor interest and notoriety. Within twenty- four hours the delegations began to arrive, and from that time onward for a fortnight they kept coming.
Here was a gorgeous triumph; they were missed; they were mourned; hearts were breaking on their account; tears were being shed; accusing memories of unkindness to these poor lost lads were rising up, and unavailing regrets and re- morse were being indulged; and best of all, the depart- ed were the talk of the whole town, and the envy of all the boys, as far as this dazzling notoriety was con- cerned.