novel


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nov·el 1

 (nŏv′əl)
n.
1. A fictional prose narrative of considerable length, typically having a plot that is unfolded by the actions, speech, and thoughts of the characters.
2. The literary genre represented by novels.

[Ultimately from Old Italian novella, piece of news, chit-chat, tale, novella, from Vulgar Latin *novella, from neuter pl. of Latin novellus, diminutive of novus, new; see newo- in Indo-European roots.]

nov·el 2

 (nŏv′əl)
adj.
Strikingly new, unusual, or different. See Synonyms at new.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin novellus, diminutive of novus; see newo- in Indo-European roots.]

nov′el·ly adv.

novel

(ˈnɒvəl)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an extended work in prose, either fictitious or partly so, dealing with character, action, thought, etc, esp in the form of a story
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the novel the literary genre represented by novels
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (usually plural) obsolete a short story or novella, as one of those in the Decameron of Boccaccio
[C15: from Old French novelle, from Latin novella (narrātiō) new (story); see novel2]

novel

(ˈnɒvəl)
adj
of a kind not seen before; fresh; new; original: a novel suggestion.
[C15: from Latin novellus new, diminutive of novus new]

novel

(ˈnɒvəl)
n
(Law) Roman law a new decree or an amendment to an existing statute

nov•el1

(ˈnɒv əl)

n.
a fictitious prose narrative of considerable length and complexity, portraying characters and usu. presenting a sequential organization of action and scenes.
[1560–70; < Italian novella (storia) new kind of story]
nov`el•is′tic, adj.
nov`el•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

nov•el2

(ˈnɒv əl)

adj.
of a new kind; different from anything seen or known before: a novel idea.
[1375–1425; late Middle English (< Middle French, Old French) < Latin novellus fresh, young, novel, diminutive of novus new]
syn: See new.

novel

A fictitious narrative in which characters and action are usually a reflection of real life.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.novel - an extended fictional work in prosenovel - an extended fictional work in prose; usually in the form of a story
fiction - a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact
detective novel, mystery novel - novel in which the reader is challenged to solve a puzzle before the detective explains it at the end
dime novel, penny dreadful - a melodramatic paperback novel
novelette, novella - a short novel
roman a clef - a novel in which actual persons and events are disguised as fictional characters
romance - a novel dealing with idealized events remote from everyday life
roman fleuve - a French novel in the form of a long chronicle of a family or other social group
2.novel - a printed and bound book that is an extended work of fiction; "his bookcases were filled with nothing but novels"; "he burned all the novels"
book, volume - physical objects consisting of a number of pages bound together; "he used a large book as a doorstop"
Adj.1.novel - original and of a kind not seen before; "the computer produced a completely novel proof of a well-known theorem"
original - being or productive of something fresh and unusual; or being as first made or thought of; "a truly original approach"; "with original music"; "an original mind"
2.novel - pleasantly new or different; "common sense of a most refreshing sort"
new - not of long duration; having just (or relatively recently) come into being or been made or acquired or discovered; "a new law"; "new cars"; "a new comet"; "a new friend"; "a new year"; "the New World"

novel

1
noun story, tale, fiction, romance, narrative He had all but finished writing a first novel.
Quotations
"Yes - oh dear yes - the novel tells a story" [E.M. Forster Aspects of the Novel]
"There are three rules for writing the novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are" [W. Somerset Maugham]
"novel: a short story padded" [Ambrose Bierce The Devil's Dictionary]
"If you try to nail anything down in the novel, either it kills the novel, or the novel gets up and walks away with the nail" [D.H. Lawrence Phoenix]

novel

2
adjective new, different, original, fresh, unusual, innovative, uncommon, singular, ground-breaking, left-field (informal) Staging your own murder mystery party is a novel way to entertain a group of friends.
common, traditional, usual, ordinary, ancient, old-fashioned, customary, run-of-the-mill

novel

adjective
1. Not the same as what was previously known or done:
2. Not usual or ordinary:
Slang: offbeat.
Translations
جَديد وَغريبروايةرِوَايَةٌرِوايَه
románneotřelýnezvyklýnovýoriginální
romanhidtil ukendtny
رمان
romaaniuudenlainenuusi
उपन्यासकथाकहानी
roman
regény
novel
nÿr; frumlegur, nÿstárlegurskáldsaga
小説新奇
소설
jaunsnebijisromāns
roman
nezvyklýromán
roman
roman
นิยาย
romanyeni ve farklıalışılmamış
tiểu thuyết

novel

[ˈnɒvəl]
A. ADJ [idea, suggestion, method] → original, novedoso
it was a novel experience for himera una experiencia nueva para él
B. Nnovela f

novel

[ˈnɒvəl]
nroman m
adj (= new) [idea, approach] → original(e); [experience, situation] → nouveau(nouvelle)

novel

1
nRoman m

novel

2
adjneu(artig)

novel

[ˈnɒvl]
1. adjoriginale, nuovo/a after n
2. n (Literature) → romanzo

novel1

(ˈnovəl) noun
a book telling a long story in prose. the novels of Charles Dickens.
ˈnovelist noun
the writer of a novel. Dickens was a great novelist.

novel2

(ˈnovəl) adjective
new and strange. a novel idea.
ˈnoveltyplural ˈnovelties noun
1. newness and strangeness. It took her a long time to get used to the novelty of her surroundings.
2. something new and strange. Snow is a novelty to people from hot countries.
3. a small, cheap manufactured thing sold as a toy or souvenir. a stall selling novelties.

novel

رِوَايَةٌ román roman Roman μυθιστόρημα novela romaani roman roman romanzo 小説 소설 roman roman powieść romance роман roman นิยาย roman tiểu thuyết 小说
References in classic literature ?
THE kind of book which is most written and read nowadays is called a novel. But we have not yet spoken much about this kind of book for until now there were no novels in our meaning of the word.
My Dear Sir: I find that my friends are not quite satisfied with the account you have given of them in your clever novel entitled " An Unsocial Socialist." You already understand that I consider it my duty to communicate my whole history, without reserve, to whoever may desire to be guided or warned by my experience, and that I have no sympathy whatever with the spirit in which one of the ladies concerned recently told you that her affairs were no business of yours or of the people who read your books.
Every few weeks she would shut herself up in her room, put on her scribbling suit, and `fall into a vortex', as she expressed it, writing away at her novel with all her heart and soul, for till that was finished she could find no peace.
"You are very right, friend," said the curate; "but for all that, if the novel pleases me you must let me copy it."
Anna answered a few words, but not foreseeing any entertainment from the conversation, she asked Annushka to get a lamp, hooked it onto the arm of her seat, and took from her bag a paper knife and an English novel. At first her reading made no progress.
Mr Sheppherd had always reminded him of a heavy father out of a three-volume novel, but, compared with his demeanour as he listened now, his attitude hitherto had been light and whimsical.
I can but say in excuse of it that I am more accustomed to handle a rifle than a pen, and cannot make any pretence to the grand literary flights and flourishes which I see in novels--for sometimes I like to read a novel. I suppose they--the flights and flourishes--are desirable, and I regret not being able to supply them; but at the same time I cannot help thinking that simple things are always the most impressive, and that books are easier to understand when they are written in plain language, though perhaps I have no right to set up an opinion on such a matter.
Some of them were dressed fashionably, and they said they couldn't for the life of them see why you should be dowdy just because you had written a novel; if you had a neat figure you might as well make the most of it, and a smart shoe on a small foot had never prevented an editor from taking your "stuff." But others thought this frivolous, and they wore "art fabrics" and barbaric jewelry.
Several years ago I published a South Sea novel. The action was placed in the Solomon Islands.
Garrow, whose subtle cross-examination of witnesses and masterly, if sometimes startling, methods of arriving at the truth seemed more thrilling to us than any novel.
Beebe sat back complacently, and Miss Alan began as follows: "It was a novel--and I am afraid, from what I can gather, not a very nice novel. It is so sad when people who have abilities misuse them, and I must say they nearly always do.
They called each other by their Christian name, were always arm in arm when they walked, pinned up each other's train for the dance, and were not to be divided in the set; and if a rainy morning deprived them of other enjoyments, they were still resolute in meeting in defiance of wet and dirt, and shut themselves up, to read novels together.

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