novelistically

nov·el·is·tic

 (nŏv′ə-lĭs′tĭk)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of novels.

nov′el·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

novelistically

(ˌnɒvəˈlɪstɪkəlɪ)
adv
in a novelistic fashion
References in periodicals archive ?
In that regard, Shelley's and Jackson's conjuring of orality sheds light on the importance of auditory perception (as in oral narrative) and feminine labor (as in textile weaving) for audience connection, albeit novelistically remediated and hypertextually virtual.
(8) In the structural circumstance of being holed up--authorially, novelistically, or as a reader--there is room for what makes Invisible Man and Ellison the writer continue to captivate some of us.
The Trainspotting author said: "I'd say to any young writer 'If you want to write novelistically, write for long form TV or write genre, if you aim to make money.
In fantasy worlds similarly, "every aspect of bureaucratic existence has been carefully stripped away" in favor of charismatic actors taking unpredictable steps in a novelistically gripping fight against absolute evil (pp.
The tensions between the archetypally vast and the novelistically local and precise is perhaps the essential and most striking aspect of her work.
This process of emergence is traceable in many lines of action, but to trace any one of them without getting drawn into others is difficult to do without damage, so novelistically multiple and tightly intertwined are the sub-plots.
Yet the seeming precision of neurology turns out to be, novelistically speaking, a blunt instrument.
May offers a thorough panorama of the contemporary American short story by discussing works produced by a new generation of writers whose narratives primarily rest on fictional tricks and games, 'novelistically' linked stories, and stories which transcend any such categories (300).
When Borges's uses of Browne are drawn into The Rings of Saturn, Sebald's work novelistically engages its own preconditions as a translation, a text that simultaneously addresses the German, the English, and the Spanish reader and, through them, all the languages and genres from which these European languages and literatures derive.
I don't think novelistically. I don't think anybody in my position could," he says.
Saruman, though, becomes morally diminished, and his character dwindles to the merely novelistically malevolent.
Como bien ha apuntado Mary Sanders Pollock, Hinojosa parece ser consciente de que "Bakhtin's dialogic theory of narrative suggests that the comprehensive rendering of a society can only be accomplished novelistically, through the juxtaposition or layering of multiple literary and extraliterary genres" (9).