novelty

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nov·el·ty

 (nŏv′əl-tē)
n. pl. nov·el·ties
1. The quality of being novel; newness.
2. Something new and unusual; an innovation.
3. A small mass-produced article, such as a toy or trinket.

novelty

(ˈnɒvəltɪ)
n, pl -ties
1.
a. the quality of being new and fresh and interesting
b. (as modifier): novelty value.
2. a new or unusual experience or occurrence
3. (often plural) a small usually cheap new toy, ornament, or trinket
[C14: from Old French novelté; see novel2]

nov•el•ty

(ˈnɒv əl ti)

n., pl. -ties,
adj. n.
1. the state or quality of being novel, new, or unique.
2. a novel occurrence, experience, etc.
3. a small decorative or amusing article, usu. mass-produced.
adj.
4.
a. (of a weave) consisting of a combination of basic weaves.
b. (of a fabric or garment) having a pattern produced by a novelty weave.
c. (of yarn) made of fibers with an irregular or unusual surface, texture, or color.
5. of or pertaining to novelties as articles of trade.
[1350–1400; < Middle French novelete < Late Latin novellitās newness]

Novelty

See also fads.

an abnormal fear of novelty. Also called cainotophobia.
a collection of items of a special, rare, novel, or unusual quality.
1. the holding of secret doctrines; the practice of limiting knowledge to a small group.
2. an interest in items of a special, rare, novel, or unusual quality. Also esoterism.esoterist, n.
1. the condition of being a griffin, or new arrival from Britain, in India.
2. behavior characteristic of a griffin.
a mania for novelty.
a hatred of novelty. Also called neophobia.
Rare. the worship of novelty. — neolater, n.
philoneism.
misoneism.
an innovator, expecially a coiner of new words.
an excessive love of novelty. Also called neophilism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.novelty - originality by virtue of being refreshingly novelnovelty - originality by virtue of being refreshingly novel
originality - the quality of being new and original (not derived from something else)
2.novelty - originality by virtue of being new and surprising
originality - the ability to think and act independently
3.novelty - a small inexpensive mass-produced article
article - one of a class of artifacts; "an article of clothing"
4.novelty - cheap showy jewelry or ornament on clothingnovelty - cheap showy jewelry or ornament on clothing
adornment - a decoration of color or interest that is added to relieve plainness
trinketry - trinkets and other ornaments of dress collectively

novelty

noun
1. newness, originality, freshness, innovation, surprise, uniqueness, strangeness, unfamiliarity The radical puritanism of Conceptual art and Minimalism had lost its novelty.
2. curiosity, marvel, rarity, oddity, wonder In those days a motor car was still a novelty.
3. trinket, souvenir, memento, bauble, bagatelle, gimcrack, trifle, gewgaw, knick-knack At Easter, we give them plastic eggs filled with small toys, novelties and coins.
Quotations
"A "new thinker", when studied closely, is merely a man who does not know what other people have thought" [F.M. Colby]

novelty

noun
1. The quality of being novel:
2. A new and unusual thing:
3. A small showy article:
Translations
جِدَّةٌ وَغَرابَهشَيءٌ جديد وَغَريبشَيء مُسْتَحْدَث يُباع كتِذْكار
drobnostnezvyklostnovostnovotasuvenýr
det nyepyntetingsouvenir
uutuus
újdonságújszerûségbazáráru
leikföng, minjagripirnÿbreytni, nÿjungnÿjung
drobnosť
alışılmamış şeydeğişiklikucuz ve küçük hediyelik eşyayenilik

novelty

[ˈnɒvəltɪ]
A. N (= quality, thing) → novedad f
once the novelty has worn offcuando pase la novedad
B. CPD novelty value Nnovedad f

novelty

[ˈnɒvəlti] n
(quality of being new and interesting)nouveauté f
Once the novelty has worn off → Une fois passé l'attrait de nouveauté ...
(new and interesting thing or situation)nouveauté f
to be a novelty → être une nouveauté
(= cheap toy or ornament) → gadget m

novelty

n
(= newness)Neuheit f; once the novelty has worn offwenn der Reiz des Neuen or der Neuheit vorbei ist
(= innovation)Neuheit f, → Novum nt; it was quite a noveltydas war etwas ganz Neues, das war ein Novum
(Comm: = trinket) → Krimskrams m

novelty

[ˈnɒvltɪ] n
a. no plnovità
b. (Comm) → oggettino, ninnolo

novel2

(ˈnovəl) adjective
new and strange. a novel idea.
ˈnoveltyplural ˈnovelties noun
1. newness and strangeness. It took her a long time to get used to the novelty of her surroundings.
2. something new and strange. Snow is a novelty to people from hot countries.
3. a small, cheap manufactured thing sold as a toy or souvenir. a stall selling novelties.
References in classic literature ?
And if novelties are to be shunned, believe me, the most alarming of all novelties, the most wild of all projects, the most rash of all attempts, is that of rendering us in pieces, in order to preserve our liberties and promote our happiness.
It was a novelty in the way of excursions--its like had not been thought of before, and it compelled that interest which attractive novelties always command.
This was a new scene to us mountaineers; the majestic oaks, the quantity of game, and the herds of stately deer were all novelties to us.
His feelings are forever on the stretch; and when he begins to sink into repose, he finds himself obliged to quit that on which he rests in pleasure for something new, which again engages his attention, and which also he forsakes for other novelties.
There had been no novelties in our house for a great many years.
com)-- An innovative and highly useful new body jewelry accessory, Navel Novelties, has been developed by inventor Cynthia Hasbany of Sylvan Lake, Michigan.
Retailers looking to sell more frozen novelties need to pay special attention to flavor when developing products.
Now, things have changed slightly, but the giving away of novelties to readers is still a practice that falls under the law.
It appears that the historic upturn in sales of ice cream and frozen novelties heading into the summer season is already well under way, as many regions of the United States experienced a relatively mild winter and a significantly warmer-than-average spring.
In comparison, 59 percent ate novelties such as ice cream sandwiches or bars.
The call came after trading standards officers across the south-west of England found more than half of 100 Christmas novelties tested could have injured children if they were left alone to play with them.