novelty


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nov·el·ty

 (nŏv′əl-tē)
n. pl. nov·el·ties
1. The quality of being novel; newness.
2. Something new and unusual; an innovation.
3. A small mass-produced article, such as a toy or trinket.

novelty

(ˈnɒvəltɪ)
n, pl -ties
1.
a. the quality of being new and fresh and interesting
b. (as modifier): novelty value.
2. a new or unusual experience or occurrence
3. (often plural) a small usually cheap new toy, ornament, or trinket
[C14: from Old French novelté; see novel2]

nov•el•ty

(ˈnɒv əl ti)

n., pl. -ties,
adj. n.
1. the state or quality of being novel, new, or unique.
2. a novel occurrence, experience, etc.
3. a small decorative or amusing article, usu. mass-produced.
adj.
4.
a. (of a weave) consisting of a combination of basic weaves.
b. (of a fabric or garment) having a pattern produced by a novelty weave.
c. (of yarn) made of fibers with an irregular or unusual surface, texture, or color.
5. of or pertaining to novelties as articles of trade.
[1350–1400; < Middle French novelete < Late Latin novellitās newness]

Novelty

See also fads.

an abnormal fear of novelty. Also called cainotophobia.
a collection of items of a special, rare, novel, or unusual quality.
1. the holding of secret doctrines; the practice of limiting knowledge to a small group.
2. an interest in items of a special, rare, novel, or unusual quality. Also esoterism.esoterist, n.
1. the condition of being a griffin, or new arrival from Britain, in India.
2. behavior characteristic of a griffin.
a mania for novelty.
a hatred of novelty. Also called neophobia.
Rare. the worship of novelty. — neolater, n.
philoneism.
misoneism.
an innovator, expecially a coiner of new words.
an excessive love of novelty. Also called neophilism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.novelty - originality by virtue of being refreshingly novelnovelty - originality by virtue of being refreshingly novel
originality - the quality of being new and original (not derived from something else)
2.novelty - originality by virtue of being new and surprising
originality - the ability to think and act independently
3.novelty - a small inexpensive mass-produced article
article - one of a class of artifacts; "an article of clothing"
4.novelty - cheap showy jewelry or ornament on clothingnovelty - cheap showy jewelry or ornament on clothing
adornment - a decoration of color or interest that is added to relieve plainness
trinketry - trinkets and other ornaments of dress collectively

novelty

noun
1. newness, originality, freshness, innovation, surprise, uniqueness, strangeness, unfamiliarity The radical puritanism of Conceptual art and Minimalism had lost its novelty.
2. curiosity, marvel, rarity, oddity, wonder In those days a motor car was still a novelty.
3. trinket, souvenir, memento, bauble, bagatelle, gimcrack, trifle, gewgaw, knick-knack At Easter, we give them plastic eggs filled with small toys, novelties and coins.
Quotations
"A "new thinker", when studied closely, is merely a man who does not know what other people have thought" [F.M. Colby]

novelty

noun
1. The quality of being novel:
2. A new and unusual thing:
3. A small showy article:
Translations
جِدَّةٌ وَغَرابَهشَيءٌ جديد وَغَريبشَيء مُسْتَحْدَث يُباع كتِذْكار
drobnostnezvyklostnovostnovotasuvenýr
det nyepyntetingsouvenir
uutuus
újdonságújszerûségbazáráru
leikföng, minjagripirnÿbreytni, nÿjungnÿjung
drobnosť
alışılmamış şeydeğişiklikucuz ve küçük hediyelik eşyayenilik

novelty

[ˈnɒvəltɪ]
A. N (= quality, thing) → novedad f
once the novelty has worn offcuando pase la novedad
B. CPD novelty value Nnovedad f

novelty

[ˈnɒvəlti] n
(quality of being new and interesting)nouveauté f
Once the novelty has worn off → Une fois passé l'attrait de nouveauté ...
(new and interesting thing or situation)nouveauté f
to be a novelty → être une nouveauté
(= cheap toy or ornament) → gadget m

novelty

n
(= newness)Neuheit f; once the novelty has worn offwenn der Reiz des Neuen or der Neuheit vorbei ist
(= innovation)Neuheit f, → Novum nt; it was quite a noveltydas war etwas ganz Neues, das war ein Novum
(Comm: = trinket) → Krimskrams m

novelty

[ˈnɒvltɪ] n
a. no plnovità
b. (Comm) → oggettino, ninnolo

novel2

(ˈnovəl) adjective
new and strange. a novel idea.
ˈnoveltyplural ˈnovelties noun
1. newness and strangeness. It took her a long time to get used to the novelty of her surroundings.
2. something new and strange. Snow is a novelty to people from hot countries.
3. a small, cheap manufactured thing sold as a toy or souvenir. a stall selling novelties.
References in classic literature ?
You may imagine the young people brushed up after the labours of the day, and making this novelty, as they would make any novelty, the excuse for walking together and enjoying a trivial flirtation.
Hearken not to the voice which petulantly tells you that the form of government recommended for your adoption is a novelty in the political world; that it has never yet had a place in the theories of the wildest projectors; that it rashly attempts what it is impossible to accomplish.
It was a novelty in the way of excursions--its like had not been thought of before, and it compelled that interest which attractive novelties always command.
I replied: That is a novelty. Will horsemen carry torches and pass them one to another during the race?
The novelty Anna Pavlovna was setting before her guests that evening was Boris Drubetskoy, who had just arrived as a special messenger from the Prussian army and was aide-de-camp to a very important personage.
"Sunshine before Sunrise!" There's a novelty in that, for poetic use at least, so far as we know, though we remember one fine paragraph about it in Sartor Resartus.
The novelty of an evening's entertainment, conducted from beginning to end by the unaided exertions of a young lady
When the novelty of amusement there was over, it would be time for the wider range of London.
So it was that she looked upon Martin Eden as a novelty, a strange individual, and she identified with novelty and strangeness the effects he produced upon her.
When all was ready, she took me from the drawer, let a single drop of lavender fall in my bosom, and tripped down stairs toward the drawing- room; Betts Shoreham and Mademoiselle Hennequin were together, and, for a novelty, alone.
Thus children are ever ready, when novelty knocks, to desert their dearest ones.
The idea that my sister should marry a gentleman--ah--in business was something of a novelty."