noverint

noverint

(ˈnəʊvəˌrɪnt)
n
1. (Law) a writ
2. (Law) a law-clerk; a person who draws up writs
3. (Law) the profession or activity of a law-clerk
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Quapropter sacerdotes per ecclesias sibi commissas populo omni instantia praedicare debent, ut noverint, haec omnimodis falsa esse, et non a divino sed a maligno spiritu talia phantasmata mentibus infidelium irrogari" (my emphasis).
Shakespeare is not only the "Shake-Scene" slandered by Robert Greene in his 1592 Groat's-Worth of Wit, but the "Noverint" or law clerk, referred to disparagingly by Thomas Nash three years earlier (most scholars take this to be Thomas Kyd).
The phrase by these presents (meaning 'by this document') is still encountered in a fuller form, "Know all men by these presents" (a loan translation of the Latin noverint universi per praesentes), suggesting a Norman or earlier origin.
gloria tibi, Domine, nunca me falta" (3, 246); "amigos usque ad mortuorum" (14, 406); "todo genero armorum" (23, 536); "algun fructus ventris" (25, 562); "hacer un noverint universi" (33, 675).