novice

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nov·ice

 (nŏv′ĭs)
n.
1. A person new to a field or activity; a beginner.
2. A person who has entered a religious order but has not yet taken final vows. Also called novitiate.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin novīcius, from Latin, recently entered into a condition, from Latin novus, new; see newo- in Indo-European roots.]

novice

(ˈnɒvɪs)
n
1.
a. a person who is new to or inexperienced in a certain task, situation, etc; beginner; tyro
b. (as modifier): novice driver.
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a probationer in a religious order
3. (General Sporting Terms) a sportsman, esp an oarsman, who has not won a recognized prize, performed to an established level, etc
4. (Horse Racing) a racehorse, esp a steeplechaser or hurdler, that has not won a specified number of races
[C14: via Old French from Latin novīcius, from novus new]

nov•ice

(ˈnɒv ɪs)

n.
1. a person who is new to the circumstances, work, etc., in which he or she is placed; beginner.
2. a person admitted into a religious order or congregation for a period of probation before taking vows.
3. a new member of a church.
[1300–50; < Middle French novice < Medieval Latin novītius convent novice < Latin novīcius newly come into a particular status, derivative of novus new]
nov′ice•hood`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.novice - someone who has entered a religious order but has not taken final vowsnovice - someone who has entered a religious order but has not taken final vows
religious person - a person who manifests devotion to a deity
2.novice - someone new to a field or activitynovice - someone new to a field or activity  
unskilled person - a person who lacks technical training
abecedarian - a novice learning the rudiments of some subject
apprentice, prentice, learner - works for an expert to learn a trade
cub, greenhorn, rookie - an awkward and inexperienced youth
landlubber, landsman, lubber - an inexperienced sailor; a sailor on the first voyage
fledgeling, fledgling, newbie, newcomer, entrant, freshman, neophyte, starter - any new participant in some activity
tenderfoot - an inexperienced person (especially someone inexperienced in outdoor living)
trainee - someone who is being trained

novice

noun
1. beginner, pupil, amateur, newcomer, trainee, apprentice, learner, neophyte, tyro, probationer, newbie (slang), proselyte I'm a novice at these things. You're the professional.
beginner teacher, professional, expert, master, ace, guru, boffin (Brit. informal), old hand, grandmaster, wonk (informal), maven, fundi (S. African), doyen or (fem.) doyenne
2. novitiate She had entered the monastery as a novice many months previously.

novice

noun
1. One who is just starting to learn or do something:
Slang: rookie.
2. An entrant who has not yet taken the final vows of a religious order:
Translations
راهِب مُبْتَدئ في دَيْرمُبْتَدئ في مِهْنَه
nováčeknoviczačátečník
novicenybegynder
aloittelijanoviisivasta-alkaja
apácajelöltpapnövendék
munks-/nunnuefninÿliîi; nÿgræîingur, byrjandi
初心者
novicijus
iesācējsnovicenovicis
nováčiknovic
acemirahip/rahibe adayıyeni

novice

[ˈnɒvɪs]
A. Nprincipiante mf, novato/a m/f (Rel) → novicio/a m/f (Sport) → principiante mf, novato/a m/f
he's no noviceno es ningún principiante
to be a novice at a jobser nuevo en un oficio
B. ADJ a novice painterun pintor principiante, un aspirante a pintor

novice

[ˈnɒvɪs] n
(= inexperienced person) → novice mf
to be a novice at sth → être novice en qch
(RELIGION) (= in monastery, convent) → novice mf

novice

n (Eccl) → Novize m, → Novizin f; (= racehorse) Pferd, das noch nicht eine bestimmte Anzahl von Rennen gewonnen hat; (fig)Neuling m, → Anfänger(in) m(f) (→ at bei, in +dat)

novice

[ˈnɒvɪs] nprincipiante m/f (Rel) → novizio/a

novice

(ˈnovis) noun
1. a beginner in any skill etc.
2. a monk or nun who has not yet taken all his or her vows.

novice

a. principiante, novicio-a.
References in classic literature ?
Two and thirty of the seniors and fifteen of the novices, most holy father.
A further proof is, that novices in the art attain to finish: of diction and precision of portraiture before they can construct the plot.
he drawls, between his contented whiffs, addressing the two perspiring novices, who have been grinding away steadily up stream for the last hour and a half; "why, Jim Biffles and Jack and I, last season, pulled up from Marlow to Goring in one afternoon - never stopped once.
The prime bullies and braves among the free trappers had each his circle of novices, from among the captain's band; mere greenhorns, men unused to Indian life; mangeurs de lard, or pork-eaters; as such new-comers are superciliously called by the veterans of the wilderness.
But had they seen the training of raw novices, it would have been a different story.
Bradbury and Breckenridge, who, novices in Indian life and the "chivalry" of the frontier, had no relish for scenes of blood and brawl.
One of the conductors of this novice held a rusty blunderbuss pointed towards his ear, and the other a very ancient sabre, with which he carved imaginary offenders as he came along in a sanguinary and anatomical manner.
Luckily, however, for the poor wretch, he had fallen into more merciful hands; for Jones having examined the pistol, and found it to be really unloaded, began to believe all the man had told him, before Partridge came up: namely, that he was a novice in the trade, and that he had been driven to it by the distress he mentioned, the greatest indeed imaginable, that of five hungry children, and a wife lying in of the sixth, in the utmost want and misery.
The novice in the military art flew from point to point, retarding his own preparations by the excess of his violent and somewhat distempered zeal; while the more practiced veteran made his arrangements with a deliberation that scorned every appearance of haste; though his sober lineaments and anxious eye sufficiently betrayed that he had no very strong professional relish for the, as yet, untried and dreaded warfare of the wilderness.
It occurred to him that he had not been dubbed a knight, and that according to the law of chivalry he neither could nor ought to bear arms against any knight; and that even if he had been, still he ought, as a novice knight, to wear white armour, without a device upon the shield until by his prowess he had earned one.
The robe was a white one with a white veil,--the garb of a novice of the Hôtel-Dien.
The "man of great merit," who was still a novice in court circles, wishing to flatter Anna Pavlovna by defending her former position on this question, observed: