nuclear stalemate

nuclear stalemate

A concept that postulates a situation wherein the relative strength of opposing nuclear forces results in mutual deterrence against employment of nuclear forces.
References in periodicals archive ?
and North Korea in order to strike a breakthrough on the nuclear stalemate.
In a phone conversation with US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson earlier in the day, South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha reaffirmed that Seoul will seek to improve ties with Pyongyang simultaneously with efforts to resolve the current nuclear stalemate, according to the ministry.
Ending the nuclear stalemate with the West in the immediate future is the most crucial challenge facing the Rowhani administration, because of the direct link between sanctions and the country's economic difficulties.
Rather, our point is that key beliefs about nuclear weapons have been overturned; scholars and analysts need to reexamine their underlying assumptions about nuclear stalemate and deterrence.
The US and Israel, Iran's archenemies, have not ruled out a military strike on Tehran if diplomacy fails to resolve the nuclear stalemate.
Western sanctions against Iran will not halt Tehran's nuclear program, Davutoglu told the Munich Security Conference on Sunday, reiterating that negotiations were the best way to settle the Iranian nuclear stalemate.
For instance, Turkish papers pointed out that Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan was angered when Tehran agreed to Brazil's mediation efforts to resolve the nuclear stalemate while it rejected Ankara's, before he decided to fly off to Tehran to ink the deal.
The above being the case, the question arises as to why the Iranian hardliners and the West led by the United States are all of a sudden showing so much flexibility when dealing with the nuclear stalemate.
Iran is reporting that Russian President Vladimir Putin made a proposal, during his visit to Tehran on 18 October, that could break the nuclear stalemate.
Another Tehran concern was that the US will exploit any dialogue with Iran at Sharm el-Shaikh for its "hostile intentions", by arguing that it went the extra mile in the diplomatic path to resolve the nuclear stalemate.
In the face of nuclear stalemate at the apex of the global system and universal rebellion at the base, can any imperial project now succeed?
The first stemmed from the political frustrations imposed by the post-Cuban Missile Crisis nuclear stalemate.