red blood cell

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Related to nucleated red blood cell: reticulocyte

red blood cell

n. Abbr. RBC
A cell in the blood of vertebrates that transports oxygen and carbon dioxide to and from the tissues. In mammals, the red blood cell is disk-shaped and biconcave, contains hemoglobin, and lacks a nucleus. Also called erythrocyte, red cell, red corpuscle.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

red blood cell

n
(Biochemistry) another name for erythrocyte
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

red′ blood′ cell`


n.
any of the cells of the blood that in mammals are enucleate disks concave on both sides, contain hemoglobin, and carry oxygen to the cells and tissues and carbon dioxide back to the respiratory organs. Also called erythrocyte, red′ blood′ cor`puscle. Abbr.: RBC
[1905–10]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

red blood cell

(rĕd)
Any of the disc-shaped cells that circulate in the blood of vertebrate animals, contain hemoglobin, and give blood its red color. The hemoglobin binds to oxygen, which is then transported by the cells to all of the tissues of the body. The red blood cells of mammals have no nucleus. Red blood cells are formed in the bone marrow. Also called erythrocyte. See more at cell.
Did You Know? Blood contains many cell types, but the distinctive red color comes from the aptly named red blood cells (RBCs). RBCs have their rich red color because of a vitally important iron-containing protein called hemoglobin. The protein picks up oxygen molecules as the blood exchanges gases in the lungs. The RBCs then carry oxygen to the far reaches of the body, where it is released for use by other cells, such as those of the brain and muscles. Just as importantly, after the RBC drops off its load of oxygen, its hemoglobin picks up carbon dioxide, the waste product of those brain and muscle cells, and brings it back to the lungs to be breathed out. All animals have some oxygen distribution system, but only vertebrate animals use RBCs. In some invertebrate animals, such as the earthworm, oxygen is transported using hemoglobin that is freely dissolved in the blood. Other invertebrates don't use hemoglobin at all. The horseshoe crab, for instance, uses copper instead of iron, making its blood blue instead of red.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.red blood cell - a mature blood cell that contains hemoglobin to carry oxygen to the bodily tissuesred blood cell - a mature blood cell that contains hemoglobin to carry oxygen to the bodily tissues; a biconcave disc that has no nucleus
blood cell, blood corpuscle, corpuscle - either of two types of cells (erythrocytes and leukocytes) and sometimes including platelets
macrocyte, megalocyte - abnormally large red blood cell (associated with pernicious anemia)
megaloblast - abnormally large red blood cell present in pernicious anemia and folic acid deficiency
acanthocyte - an abnormal red blood cell that has thorny projections of protoplasm
microcyte - an abnormally small red blood cell (less than 5 microns in diameter)
reticulocyte - an immature red blood cell containing a network of filaments or granules
sickle cell - an abnormal red blood cell that has a crescent shape and an abnormal form of hemoglobin
siderocyte - an abnormal red blood cell containing granules of iron not bound in hemoglobin
spherocyte - an abnormal spherical red blood cell
target cell - an abnormal red blood cell with the appearance of a dark ring surrounding a dark center; associated with anemia
haemoglobin, Hb, hemoglobin - a hemoprotein composed of globin and heme that gives red blood cells their characteristic color; function primarily to transport oxygen from the lungs to the body tissues; "fish have simpler hemoglobin than mammals"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The various stages were correlated with nucleated red blood cell count per 100 white blood cell count.
Evaluation of nucleated red blood cell count by SysmexXE-2100 in patients with thalassaemia or sickle cell anemias and in neonates.
The increased nucleated red blood cell (NRBC) count and reticulocyte (RETIC) count both points to rapid red cell regeneration consistent with a hemolytic process.
Are elevated fetal nucleated red blood cell counts and indirect reflection of enhanced erythropoietin activity?
The new edition incorporates cystatin C, coenzyme Q10, and nucleated red blood cell count.
of basophils, /[micro]L >500 Reticulocyte 12 Absolute reticulocyte, >0.250 x [10.sup.3]/[micro]L Suspect flags 13 Nucleated red blood cell Flag 14 Blast Flag 15 Atypical lymphocyte Flag 16 RBC fragment Flag 17 Dimorphic RBC Flag 18 Lyse resistant Flag 19 Immature granulocyte Flag 20 Left shift Flag 21 PLT clump Flag 22 Platelet (except PLT clump) Flag 23 Suspect flags Flag Abbreviations: CBC, complete blood count; HGB, hemoglobin; MCV, mean corpuscular volume; PLT, platelet; RDW, red cell distribution width; WBC, white blood cell; RBC, red blood cell.
This book is essentially the same as the fourth edition from 2003, with the addition of few new measurements [coenzyme Q10, cystatin C, nucleated red blood cell count (absolute and relative)] and some new data on iron binding capacity.
Nucleated red blood cell count at birth as an index of perinatal brain damage.
[6] Nonstandard abbreviations: NRBC, nucleated red blood cell; FACS, fluorescence-activated cell sorting; PBS, phosphate-buffered saline; HSA, human serum albumin; RBC, red blood cell; WBC, white blood cell; BSA, bovine serum albumin; and SDS-PAGE, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.
But it also proved to be the genesis of a new industry and the catalyst for a lifetime of groundbreaking inventions, including widespread use of blood parameters like platelets, reticulocytes and nucleated red blood cell counts, as well as the field of flow cytometry, automated sample handling and closed-tube sampling.