nunhood

nunhood

(ˈnʌnhʊd)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the condition, practice, or character of a nun
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) nuns collectively
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References in periodicals archive ?
It was also submitted that nunhood is a religious lifestyle and not a profession.
Because her nunhood was no longer valid, (2) can only mean leaving the Order physically and socially, but not legally, just as in the case of the monk discussed above.
One of the brothers, a sister this time, since the brotherhood embraces both sexes, who was shortly to proceed herself across Imber causeway to nunhood, became deranged and threw herself into the lake.
Three years after being jailed, in September 1997 Paduva's life story had taken another twist when a young nun, Beatrice, left nunhood to marry him after coming to know of his tale.
There are many cases in Cambodia of women who enter the nunhood following experiences of sexual abuse.
Jesme, in her book, states various incidents of harassment and sexual activities prevailing in the convents besides narrating her personal trauma during her nunhood.
After she is reunited with her family, Kieu's commitment remains unshaken: "To nunhood vowed, I'll stay here till the end" (l.
A part of her mourns with us the culture gap which finds liberated communities that value maturity and creativity but are slow to attract younger women who prefer the outward trappings of nunhood presented by more traditional orders.
Before her nine years in nunhood, Dhammarakhita worked as a secretary and translator.
He explains that if her taking up the pen (in all its phallic connotations) made her more masculine--as writing was the near exclusive domain of men--then her nunhood neutralized her gender.
I always knew the man above had never given me the nod for the nunhood.
Second, all three studies call attention to the contested nature of nunhood in ancient India.