nunnery

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Related to nunneries: convent

nun·ner·y

 (nŭn′ə-rē)
n. pl. nun·ner·ies
A convent of nuns.

nunnery

(ˈnʌnərɪ)
n, pl -neries
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the convent or religious house of a community of nuns

nun•ner•y

(ˈnʌn ə ri)

n., pl. -ner•ies.
a convent for nuns.
[1225–75]

Nunnery

 a community of nuns; a convent, 1275.
Examples: nunnery of eyes, 1651; of lively black-ey’d vestals, 1715.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nunnery - the convent of a community of nunsnunnery - the convent of a community of nuns  
convent - a religious residence especially for nuns

nunnery

noun convent, house, abbey, monastery, cloister In monasteries and nunneries, prayers are being offered for him.
Quotations
"Get thee to a nunnery" [William Shakespeare Hamlet]
Translations
دَيْر للراهِبات
klášter
nonnekloster
apácakolostorapácazárdazárda
nunnuklaustur
kadınlar manastırı

nunnery

[ˈnʌnərɪ] Nconvento m de monjas

nunnery

[ˈnʌnəri] ncouvent m

nunnery

n (old)(Nonnen)kloster nt

nunnery

[ˈnʌnərɪ] nconvento

nun

(nan) noun
a member of a female religious community.
ˈnunneryplural ˈnunneries noun
a house in which a group of nuns live; a convent.
References in periodicals archive ?
After Prince Llywelyn was killed and his brother Dafydd executed the rest of the princely family of Gwynedd were imprisoned or sent to nunneries in England.
President Aoun's stance came Wednesday as he received at Baabda Presidential Palace a delegation of gatherings of heads of nunneries.
To promote the latter, the Gyalwang Drukpa has established several nunneries under the umbrella of Druk Gawa Khilwa in the Himalayas that teach traditional spirituality besides English, Hindi and Himalayan languages apart from computer skills as well as martial arts.
The team from the Dyfed Archaeological Trust and the University of Wales Trinity Saint David (UWTSD) say the dig is at its early stages, but medieval nunneries like this are incredibly rare with only one other known in Wales.
This book sets a new standard in its examination of nunneries in relation to the economic, political, and social issues of life in a Renaissance city.
She describes how nuns and nunneries contributed to the social and political world from the Black Death in 1348 to the fall of the Florentine republic in 1530.
According to The Telegraph, Phurbu Tsering Rinpoche, the 52-year-old head of the Pangri and Yatseg nunneries in Kardze County, was arrested in a dawn raid on May 18, 2008.
Dhammananda's mission was to visit Buddhist nunneries and learn about their living.
While some Tibetan monastics are able to stay in monasteries and nunneries for free, Western monks and nuns have to pay for lodging and food.
Leadership in Medieval English Nunneries (Studies in the History of Medieval Religion, 24), Woodbridge, Boydell Press, 2005; hardback; pp.
When Bill O'Reilly's forebears were streaming over from Ireland, groups with names like "Supreme Order of the Star-Spangled Banner" railed against these redheaded runts, many of them conceived in the "legalized Sodoms" and "Popish brothels" described by the reformed priest William Hogan in his nativist tract Auricular Confession and Popish Nunneries.
For the last forty years, ever since we've been in India, nunneries have developed better.