oat

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oat

 (ōt)
n.
1. often oats(used with a sing. or pl. verb)
a. Any of various grasses of the genus Avena, especially A. sativa, widely cultivated for their edible grains.
b. The grain of any of these plants, used as food and fodder.
2. A musical pipe made of an oat straw.

[Middle English ote, from Old English āte.]

oat

(əʊt)
n
1. (Plants) an erect annual grass, Avena sativa, grown in temperate regions for its edible seed
2. (Plants) (usually plural) the seeds or fruits of this grass
3. (Plants) any of various other grasses of the genus Avena, such as the wild oat
4. (Instruments) poetic a flute made from an oat straw
5. feel one's oats informal
a. to feel exuberant
b. to feel self-important
6. get one's oats slang to have sexual intercourse
7. sow one's oats sow one's wild oats to indulge in adventure or promiscuity during youth
[Old English āte, of obscure origin]

oat


(ōt),
n.
1. a cereal grass, Avena sativa, cultivated for its edible grain.
2. Usu., oats. the grain of this plant.
3. any of several other plants of the genus Avena, as the wild oat.
4. Archaic. a musical pipe made of an oat straw.
Idioms:
feel one's oats,
a. to feel or show giddy animation.
b. to have a strong sense of one's own power.
[before 900; Middle English ote, Old English āte]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oat - annual grass of Europe and North Africaoat - annual grass of Europe and North Africa; grains used as food and fodder (referred to primarily in the plural: `oats')
Avena sativa, cereal oat - widely cultivated in temperate regions for its edible grains
Avena fatua, wild oat, wild oat grass - common in meadows and pastures
Avena barbata, slender wild oat - oat of southern Europe and southwestern Asia
animated oat, Avene sterilis, wild red oat - Mediterranean oat held to be progenitor of modern cultivated oat
cereal, cereal grass - grass whose starchy grains are used as food: wheat; rice; rye; oats; maize; buckwheat; millet
2.oat - seed of the annual grass Avena sativa (spoken of primarily in the plural as `oats')
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
food grain, grain, cereal - foodstuff prepared from the starchy grains of cereal grasses
Avena sativa, cereal oat - widely cultivated in temperate regions for its edible grains
Translations
oves
havre
aveno
kaer
kaura
zob
zab
oves
havre

oat

n usu plHafer m; oats pl (Cook) → Haferflocken pl; to sow one’s wild oats (fig)sich (dat)die Hörner abstoßen; he’s feeling his oatsihn sticht der Hafer; to be off one’s oats (hum inf)keinen Appetit haben; he hasn’t had his oats for some time (hum inf)der hat schon lange keine mehr vernascht (hum sl)
References in periodicals archive ?
The multiple linear regression equations are efficient in the simulation of oat grain yield under conditions of use of growth regulator, regardless of the N-fertilizer dose.
There is no information on the cellular location of avenanthramides in oat grain, but if, as in leaves, avenanthramides are incorporated into cell walls, the association with [beta]-glucan seems to be logical.
For reduced, high and very high use of N-fertilizer, the growth regulator dose of 495 mL [ha.sup.-1] efficiently reduces lodging without damages on oat grain yield, in favorable, intermediate or unfavorable year for cultivation.
Our objectives were to determine genotypic and environmental effects on oat kernel size distributions as measured by these two methods and to relate these characteristics with other quality characteristics in oat grain.
These results show that the stability in oat grain yield by the use of N-fertilizer had already been achieved, although the conditions of the cultivation year were favorable and without the need of high N doses.
A recurrent selection program to improve oat grain yield was initiated at the University of Minnesota in 1968 (Stuthman and Stucker, 1975).
Because selection for greater [beta]-glucan content is designed to improve the effect of oat grain on human health, its effect on other components that affect the dietary quality of the grain, such as protein and oil, should be investigated.
A relatively small amount of information is available in the literature describing the effects of environment and genotype on oat grain yield and quality.
The groat percentage is important because it represents the economic yield an oat miller can derive from a given lot of oat grain. It also provides an estimate of the digestible portion of the grain, if being fed to animals.
Test weight is the primary indicator of oat grain quality, so it is important to determine if test weight and lipase activity have a genetic correlation.
Hull percentage is considered to be a reliable physical indicator of oat grain quality.