obdurate

(redirected from obduracies)
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ob·du·rate

 (ŏb′do͝o-rĭt, -dyo͝o-)
adj.
1. Not changing in response to argument or other influence; obstinate or intractable: "Everyone in the region has been obdurate in water negotiations with everyone else" (Marq de Villiers).
2.
a. Hardened in wrongdoing or wickedness; stubbornly impenitent: "obdurate conscience of the old sinner" (Sir Walter Scott).
b. Hardened against feeling; hardhearted: an obdurate miser.

[Middle English obdurat, from Late Latin obdūrātus, past participle of obdūrāre, to harden, from Latin, to be hard, endure : ob-, intensive pref.; see ob- + dūrus, hard; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]

ob′du·rate·ly adv.
ob′du·ra·cy (-do͝or-ə-sē, -dyo͝or-), ob′du·rate·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

obdurate

(ˈɒbdjʊrɪt)
adj
1. not easily moved by feelings or supplication; hardhearted
2. impervious to persuasion, esp to moral persuasion
[C15: from Latin obdūrāre to make hard, from ob- (intensive) + dūrus hard; compare endure]
ˈobduracy, ˈobdurateness n
ˈobdurately adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ob•du•rate

(ˈɒb dʊ rɪt, -dyʊ-)

adj.
1. unmoved by persuasion or pity; unyielding.
2. stubbornly resistant to moral influence; impenitent: an obdurate sinner.
[1400–50; late Middle English obdurat < Latin obdūrāre to harden, be persistent =ob- ob- + dūrāre to harden, derivative of durus hard]
ob′du•rate•ly, adv.
ob′du•rate•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.obdurate - stubbornly persistent in wrongdoingobdurate - stubbornly persistent in wrongdoing
unregenerated, unregenerate - not reformed morally or spiritually; "unregenerate human nature"; "unregenerate conservatism"
2.obdurate - showing unfeeling resistance to tender feelings; "his flinty gaze"; "the child's misery would move even the most obdurate heart"
hardhearted, heartless - lacking in feeling or pity or warmth
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

obdurate

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

obdurate

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

obdurate

[ˈɒbdjʊrɪt] ADJ (= stubborn) → obstinado, terco; (= unyielding) → inflexible, firme
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

obdurate

[ˈɒbdjʊrət] adj
[person] → obstiné(e)
to remain obdurate → s'obstiner
[refusal] → obstiné
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

obdurate

adj (= stubborn)hartnäckig; sinnerverstockt, halsstarrig; (= hard-hearted)unnachgiebig, unerbittlich
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

obdurate

[ˈɒbdjʊrɪt] (frm) adj (unyielding) → irremovibile; (stubborn) → caparbio/a, pervicace; (hard-hearted) → insensibile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on his long term work in urban Africa and more recently in Jakarta, Simone reflects strategically on the interstice of effaced and sustained distinctions between the habitable and uninhabitable, particularly in the context of accelerated transformations and obduracies in mega-urban regions of what was considered to be the Global South.
Prendergast's selection of horror stories covers errors, obduracies, frustrations, discomforts, betrayals, callousness to staff, and politics that benefit the haves and take from the have-nots.