obdurateness


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ob·du·rate

 (ŏb′do͝o-rĭt, -dyo͝o-)
adj.
1. Not changing in response to argument or other influence; obstinate or intractable: "Everyone in the region has been obdurate in water negotiations with everyone else" (Marq de Villiers).
2.
a. Hardened in wrongdoing or wickedness; stubbornly impenitent: "obdurate conscience of the old sinner" (Sir Walter Scott).
b. Hardened against feeling; hardhearted: an obdurate miser.

[Middle English obdurat, from Late Latin obdūrātus, past participle of obdūrāre, to harden, from Latin, to be hard, endure : ob-, intensive pref.; see ob- + dūrus, hard; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]

ob′du·rate·ly adv.
ob′du·ra·cy (-do͝or-ə-sē, -dyo͝or-), ob′du·rate·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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obdurateness

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
So, Lord, we receive your Holy Word." A sermon seeking to be faithful to both Isaiah's and Matthew's proclamation of the gospel, like these contemporary hymns, will boldly proclaim the unfailing graciousness of God's initiative while recognizing the reality and amazing obdurateness of our human resistance, which only God can overcome--and has!
They have celebrated the triumphs of individuals who succeeded in accomplishing much, despite the odds and the obdurateness of classism, sexism, and racism.
Second, the sociology of standards presupposes that there already exists a well-established domain of observations and facts which cannot be subsumed by existing paradigms and whose obdurateness has been captured in repeated studies.