obeahman

obeahman

Also called a witch doctor, jujuman, root doctor, conjure man and leaf doctor, this is a priest and physician called upon by African tribal members and followers of religions such as vodoun, Santería and macumba. Obeahman practitioners who use their powers only for good are known as “ngangas.”
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
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What the British say about Obeah and the Obeahman...why denigrate that and not denigrate what ancient Greeks said about going to the Oracle?
The report grimly concludes: "Cases of children sacrificed to the obeahman's cult are not unknown in Jamaica and in country districts the performance of obeah ritual is believed capable of securing the acquittal of persons charged before the courts" (Buchanan 4).
Buddyjoe, the Obeahman and protagonist of Aaron's short story, is a trickster and a con man, preying on the fears and desires of a small rural community, but using his 'powers' for the good of his clients and in this instance to promote a love union between two young people whom he already knows share an attraction.
As the pain increases, however, she turns for help to the Obeahman, Brother Peters: "She didn't want to go to the white doctor.
Welsh, a police officer posing as an "Obeahman" obtained inculpatory statements from the accused ((2007), 51 C.R.
Morris told the court Lambie was known as the "Obeahman" - a Jamaican vodoo spirit who walks in darkness.
(3) Obeah played a crucial role in the development of Tacky's Rebellion (Reynolds 5-8), and while Tacky himself may not have been an Obeahman, scholars agree that he was at least advised by one, if not several (Schuler 384, Browne, Bryson, Aravamudan).
(4) In addition, Obeah practitioners are skilled in the "catching" of duppies, or unrested souls, which may be used for nefarious purposes; likewise, an Obeahman may be employed to release one of these duppies so that it may achieve final rest and cease interfering with the living (Brown 146).
Yet Taro, When Rocks Dance's Obeahman, is repeatedly described as "the Ibo," before whom a heavily pregnant Emilia must prostrate herself, at the beginning of the narrative, to save not only her life but those of her unborn children (6-7, my emphasis).