obiter


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Related to obiter: obiter dicta

obiter

(ˈɒbɪtə; ˈəʊbɪtə)
adv
(Law) law in a parenthetic or incidental manner
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
Further, within that judgment, the judge (Obiter Dicta) said your resignation was unprocedural He didn't say it be undone.
PRIME Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi has rightly asked in parliament whether judges have the prerogative to pronounce obiter dicta like 'thieves, dacoits and mafia' in politically-motivated cases.
Unfortunately, the senate amplified the obiter dictum (statement by the way) in the judgment, ignoring the most important part which was dismissal of the suit over locus standi, thus, of no effect.
He said it was the obiter dictum in the original DAP decision of the Supreme Court that tended to undermine the presumption of innocence and the regularlity of acts of officials when performing their functions.
Sadly the U21s Supplementary Cup tie between Obiter and AFC Liverpool had to be abandoned - with the latter winning 2-0 - due to high winds and will be re-arranged.
The phrase 'obiter dictum' is used in which legal context?
The phrase 'obiter dictum' is used in which legal Quiz of the Day ANSWERS: 1 Warren Beatty; 2 Jacob Epstein; 3 Policemen; 4 Don and Phil; 5 Green; 6 A roof; 7 Twenty; 8 A comment made by a judge; 9 The first untethered space walk; 10 24.
Obiter had a close 3-2 win at Liverpool North, Hartley and Marsh netting whilst Chris Allen, John Gandy and Jamie Miello hit the net for The King Harry in a 3-1 win over Westbury.
The design and production of the probe is completed, and the lunar obiter is undergoing ground tests.
The ruling's obiter dictum remarks said granting foreign residents local suffrage is not prohibited under the Constitution and that the matter concerns the nation's legislative policies.
She won the prize for an article in the Warwick University Law Society's magazine, Obiter Dicta, about whether or not the treatment of Binyam Mohamed while in US custody should be made public or not.
I was disappointed by your obiter dictum (passing comment) on Pope Benedict XVI in your June editorial, Why can't we simply say what we mean?