obituarist


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Related to obituarist: arrivederci
Translations

obituarist

nNachrufverfasser(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
As a devil-may-care, teenage obituarist on the local paper, your perambulating pensioner reckoned people who died at 70 had enjoyed a good "innings".
When he passed away, the London Times obituarist declared that he was a man who could have headed any western country.
(301) His friend and obituarist, John Robson, stated that "the impulse of a strong fancy made him a wanderer--the commercial man and the explorer in one....
But as "the principal obituarist at National Review," as he put it, he took more time with his eulogies.
Over a thirty-year career, Dallas contributed essays on political, social, and literary topics to at least a dozen periodicals, chief among them the Times', front the mid-1850s to the mid-1860s he served as the newspaper's primary obituarist and book reviewer, and was thus one of the most influential figures in the mid-century literary community.
Over the years, I've written on a lot of different subjects: I was "Musical Theatre Correspondent" for The Independent in London, and obituarist for The Atlantic over here.
In its preface, he records that he sent his manuscript to no fewer than nine friends, "Roman Catholic, Anglican, Quaker, and agnostic, biologist, philosopher, priest and layman." His Royal Society obituarist, W.
His obituarist exclaimed with no exaggeration that ''it is hardly possible to exaggerate the importance of this final and signal recognition on Mr Feeney's part of the true duties of citizenship''.
Early death is often seen as a kind of martyrdom, and Dawson's, it would seem, gave both him and his work an almost saintly status in some quarters: "Within a century, people will revere him as the God-man I believe him to be," an obituarist wrote.
Renowned for his good humor, Kevorkian termed himself an "obituarist", the first of a new variety of medical specialist who would assist the terminally ill to kill themselves under strictly controlled guidelines, a process he termed "medicide", or physician-assisted suicide.