obituarist


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obituarist

nNachrufverfasser(in) m(f)
References in periodicals archive ?
His friend and obituarist, John Robson, stated that "the impulse of a strong fancy made him a wanderer--the commercial man and the explorer in one.
Over the years, I've written on a lot of different subjects: I was "Musical Theatre Correspondent" for The Independent in London, and obituarist for The Atlantic over here.
His obituarist exclaimed with no exaggeration that ''it is hardly possible to exaggerate the importance of this final and signal recognition on Mr Feeney's part of the true duties of citizenship''.
Early death is often seen as a kind of martyrdom, and Dawson's, it would seem, gave both him and his work an almost saintly status in some quarters: "Within a century, people will revere him as the God-man I believe him to be," an obituarist wrote.
early readers, including her obituarist, felt that she "destroyed
Darbey's obituarist (Manitoba Free Press, 26 August 1922) emphasized the esteem afforded this fur man in whose shop ".
It was Boston Democratic City Councilman Dapper O'Neil who, in the words of his Boston Globe obituarist, "railed against feminists, gays, and immigrants.
In fact, he outlived his obituarist, Alan Walker, who died in 2004.
But the claim made by one obituarist in an English newspaper that before Baxandall "most art history [in Britain] had been written from the viewpoint of connoisseurship and attribution" is an exaggeration.
Edward Carpenter was the first brown-rice-and-sandals socialist--or, rather, since that particular cliche is a later coinage, the first 'sandals-and-song socialist', as one obituarist dubbed him posthumously in 1929.