obituary

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o·bit·u·ar·y

 (ō-bĭch′o͞o-ĕr′ē)
n. pl. o·bit·u·ar·ies
A published notice of a death, sometimes with a brief biography of the deceased.

[Medieval Latin obituārius, (report) of death, from Latin obitus, death, from past participle of obīre, to meet, meet one's death : ob-, toward; see ob- + īre, to go; see ei- in Indo-European roots.]

o·bit′u·ar′y adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

obituary

(əˈbɪtjʊərɪ)
n, pl -aries
a published announcement of a death, often accompanied by a short biography of the dead person
[C18: from Medieval Latin obituārius, from Latin obīre to fall, from ob- down + īre to go]
oˈbituarist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

o•bit•u•ar•y

(oʊˈbɪtʃ uˌɛr i)

n., pl. -ar•ies,
adj. n.
1. a notice of the death of a person, often with a biographical sketch, as in a newspaper.
adj.
2. of, pertaining to, or recording obituaries.
[1700–10; < Medieval Latin obituārius < Latin obitu(s) death (see obit)]
o•bit′u•ar•ist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.obituary - a notice of someone's deathobituary - a notice of someone's death; usually includes a short biography
notice - an announcement containing information about an event; "you didn't give me enough notice"; "an obituary notice"; "a notice of sale
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

obituary

noun death notice, eulogy, obit (informal) I read your brother's obituary in the Times.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
nekrolog
nekrolog
muistokirjoituskuolinilmoitus
nekrolog
nekrológgyászjelentés
dánartilkynningminning
死亡記事
사망 기사
nekrologas
nekrologs
nekrológ
dödsruna
การประกาศข่าวมรณกรรม
anma yazısıölüm ilânı
cáo phó

obituary

[əˈbɪtjʊərɪ]
A. Nnecrología f, obituario m
B. CPD obituary column Nsección f necrológica
obituary notice Nnecrología f, esquela f de defunción
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

obituary

[əˈbɪtʃuəri] nnécrologie fobituary column nrubrique f nécrologique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

obituary

nNachruf m; obituary noticeTodesanzeige f; I saw his obituary notice todayich habe seinen Namen heute im Sterberegister gelesen; obituary columnSterberegister nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

obituary

[əˈbɪtjʊərɪ] nnecrologio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

obituary

(əˈbitjuəri) plural oˈbituaries noun
a notice (eg in a newspaper) of a person's death, often with an account of his life and work.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

obituary

نَعْيٌ nekrolog nekrolog Todesanzeige νεκρολογία necrológica, obituario muistokirjoitus nécrologie nekrolog necrologio 死亡記事 사망 기사 overlijdensbericht dødsannonse nekrolog necrologia, necrológio некролог dödsruna การประกาศข่าวมรณกรรม anma yazısı cáo phó 讣告
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
Bret Stephens | NYT Syndicate FRIENDS and colleagues who knew Roger Ailes better than I did attest that he was a nicer and more considerate man than most liberal obituarists will ever give him credit for.
Carwyn the friend was a unique and beloved man of greater consequence than all his public achievements, and the reason why he taxed so many of his obituarists, many of them journalists who found themselves stunned at the news of his death, sitting silently beside the telephone while they struggled to find the right phrase.
Malaysia Airlines, meanwhile, has attracted the attention of business obituarists, even though there's no evidence that either of its misfortunes was of its own making.
Further collections of essays on education, historiography, and the rule of law gave added weight to the judgment of his obituarists that he was, in the words of the usually anti-conservative Guardian, "perhaps the most original academic political philosopher of this [20th] century."
The obituarists of the British press circulated an estimate of "upwards of 15 millions [pounds sterling]" (Clark 2013).
When Howe died in 2008, obituarists recalled how six years earlier an interview he conducted with then United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan had turned up, much to the latter's horror, in the pages of Penthouse between articles entitled 'Sex, Blood and Videotape' and 'Pimp's Confession'.
When writing about the history of similarly problematic but popular terms such as 'hysteria' and 'psychosomatic', Aubrey Lewis [13] warned that favourite terms such as these have a tendency to outlive their obituarists. Two aspects of this problem still need investigating.
As we have noted here often, the bull market in bonds has buried many of its would-be obituarists.
No one has tried harder than me to discern an overall plan - gravediggers and obituarists living to a ripe old age (makes sense, when you think about it), Tchaikovsky finishing the Pathetique despite drinking a glass of unboiled water during a cholera epidemic - but sometimes you're forced to wonder.
Among his obituarists, it was left to a dissident Jugoslav communist, Vladimir Dedijer, to point what the difference was; remarking on his discovery that Cole 'rejected the idea of the continued supremacy of the State' and believed that 'it was destined to disappear'.
"The rule is never speak ill of the dead, but the obituarists [sic] and commemorators [sic] who wrote about Ginsberg upon his death could not have broken the rule even if they had wanted to, since they could see no ill in him to speak of at all" (52).