object relations theory


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object relations theory

n
(Psychoanalysis) a form of psychoanalytic theory postulating that people relate to others in order to develop themselves
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Adolescence and Delinquency is less an attempt to apply object relations theory to a particular population than it is an attempt to illuminate the seamlessness of theory and application.
The chapters are well written, and the book is logically organized and sequenced, providing background in psychodynamic and object relations theory before moving into actual case descriptions.
According to object relations theory (Winnicott, 1965; Cashdan, 1988), these students were accessing and integrating their own power, independence, and self-worth by way of being successful in these activities.
Yet at the same time, however, Bourgeois obviously loved her mother, so there is a combined adoration and aggression that can best be explained with Kleinian object relations theory.
Juhasz's framework is derived from the British tradition of object relations theory inaugurated by Klein and Winnicott and probably most famously represented in this country by Jessica Benjamin (The Bonds of Love, Like Subjects, Love Objects).
A nagging question concerning its claims to innovation also lingers: Given the intersubjective/interpersonal emphasis of progressive contemporary psychoanalytic theorists like Stephen Mitchell, or even the broad impact of object relations theory on psychoanalytic theory and criticism since the 1960s, is it accurate to portray other psychoanalytic approaches to literature as "intra-psychic"?
(1) the sexual gratification theory derived from Freud's Oedipal complex where the sexual drive of obtaining his or her parent is paramount and (2) the object relations theory which shifts the drive from sexual to relationships as objects other than self.
Judith Brett utilises the theories of Melanie Klein and followers of object relations theory to argue that childhood is not consigned to the past, but consists of some patterns that can be found in the present also.
A second and related purpose is to offer a new way of thinking about the son's and daughter's bond with his/her father, one that is theoretically rooted in object relations theory, analytic psychology, and John Bowlby's ethological attachment theory (1969/1982, 1973, 1980; Greenberg & Mitchell, 1983; Jacobi, 1953/1970; Jung, 1933; 1959/1968).
Based on object relations theory, such motivations are conceptualized as meeting self and attachment needs.
The basis of this more-balanced approach is the object relations theory, which Holmes borrows from recent post-Freudian scholarship.
According to object relations theory, adults who do not achieve a sense of object constancy may suffer from limiting forms of maladaption, affecting their ability to form and sustain interpersonal relationships (Kernberg, 1976).

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