objectivation


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Related to objectivation: objectification

objectivation

(əbˌdʒɛktɪˈveɪʃən)
n
a variant form of objectification
References in periodicals archive ?
"Science and Securitization: Objectivation, The Authority of the Speaker and Mobilization of Scientific Facts." Security Dialogue 42, no.
There is no ontologisation, institutionalisation, sacralisation, objectivation or negation which does not manifest itself through personal relations, which is not practised in terms of personal relations, and which is not animated, maintained, originated--in a word, caused, by personal relations (ibid.
Dahlstrom rejects modern theories of the self as socially constructed; he analyzes social identity in terms of externalization, objectivation, and internalization; and he identifies institutional threats to being true to oneself from without (in institutional repression and oppression) and from within (in our responsibility for accepting or rejecting the social roles presented to us), noting that authenticity requires recognition of one's social identities and of one's degree of complicity with them.
'Objects appear at a certain moment, but technicity precedes them and goes beyond them; technical objects result from an objectivation of technicity' (p176).
It is also an instrumental form of objectivation of control relations in what subjects are part of the rational expression, which can only be expressed in a subjective way, namely: greater freedom, the greater enjoyment that cannot be expressed or valued as simple ordinal categories.
Since the tendency would be to force employees to achieve maximum results in the minimum time, the 'objectivation' of labour can be dangerous, leading to alienation or at least to a loss of meaning at work.
Objectivation tools for these relevant features of CPP/CPPS patients such as Quantitative Sensory Testing and Algometry will be further discussed in a dedicated section.
in a phobia for instance, displacement onto the phobic object permits the objectivation, localization and containment of anxiety" (123).
Bourdieu (2003b) advocated a methodology of "participant objectivation" in ethnographic research and argued that there is no absolute objectivity or subjectivity possible.