objective genitive

objective genitive

n
(Grammar) grammar a use of the genitive case to express an objective relationship, as in Latin timor mortis (fear of death)
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Others take the phrase as an objective genitive, suggesting that Paul wishes to teach the church that Christ is the one to whom the Psalter bears witness, that is, the one the Psalter is speaking about.
But there is no reason not to take this merely as an objective genitive adjunct.
Nor is it an objective genitive in the sense that the phrase "God's love of life" could be read, unless it may be regarded as shorthand for the extended phrase.
Having chosen the objective genitive, (38) Lessing investigates the moral effect of katharsis:
Anne's Church"), objective genitive ("the bishop's resignation"), and appositive genitive ("the title of vicar general"), which is periphrastic in form.
In short, Brague seeks to demonstrate that worldly wisdom, the wisdom of the world, was in premodern times usually both a subjective and an objective genitive, or rather, a subjective because an objective genitive, and vice versa.
Voegelin's "of" proves simultaneously an objective genitive, stating intentionalistically a paradox about consciousness, and a subjective genitive, being consciousness' own luminous self-presentation.
orsa tulisses ~423 inciperes): `his beginnings'; deum would belong to the type of objective genitive with which Statius achieves some compressed phrases,(13) and sunt is to be supplied: `his preludes are about the gods', for he had these already prepared, having often celebrated one or other of them.
opts for the objective genitive in the pistis Christou debate, that is, "faith in Christ" rather than "faith of Christ.
Neither is there any dispute here about a subjective or an objective genitive.
In objects or objective genitive phrases the elements were naturally placed side by side, so that here position cannot be used as evidence for the unity of the phrase, examples (12-14).
1-19) James Dunn argues against Hays' interpretation of "the faith of Jesus," arguing for the objective genitive, "faith in Jesus.