objectlessness

objectlessness

(ˈɒbdʒɪktləsnəs)
n
the condition of having no objective or goalthe condition of having no specific object as a goal or aim
References in periodicals archive ?
And within such totality self-consciousness destroys its self (sein selbst) by transforming itself (sich selbst) into the infinite object of the desire of its own, into the being of the desire that does not exist because of the objectlessness of self-consciousness.
Natalie, standing on the threshold after her final recognition, not yet a writer, represents the objectlessness of a feminine jouissance which, Jackson seems to recognize, is difficult to represent as anything other than unrealized.
It is the shadow reality of the objectlessness of Bildung, much like television, the press, special interest groups and political parties, parliaments, high commissions, armies, and stock exchanges.
Marlow is no exception to this moral perplexity--indeed, he is the reader's foil and comes to stand for the Kantian "cast of mind." This cast of mind is one of the fundamental attributes of the sublime for Kant, and forms the cornerstone for his argument on the objectlessness of it: "But since this fundamental measure is a self-contradictory concept ...
The experience of objectlessness as the supreme sensation in art is not always there.
Finally, in The Unnamable, the insistent violation of this state of objectlessness is experienced as an intense and visceral disgust, which seeks to expel the object and thereby return to the aesthetic of hunger.
It is like a big picnic without the objectlessness of a picnic." They did not live long.
This imagery of the intrusion into the nineteenth-century interior of external objectlessness sets the stage for a reading of the evolution of split dwelling and split subjectivity in early twentieth-century modernism.
Sue Grand (2000) understands evil as the "perverse hungering for [unhealthy early object-relations) as a reprieve from the objectlessness of annihilation (Fairbairn, 1952a, b; Guntrip 1971)." She explains:
(9.) In Poe's story, the absence of motive on the part of the Ourang-Outang murderer echoes the "objectlessness" ascribed to the crowd, underlining an association between such curiosity and the quasi-natural, the collapse of the nature/culture divide (the animal partially roped into culture, "imitating the motions of a barber" [25]).
research, until even the object disappears into the objectlessness of