objector


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ob·ject

(ŏb′jĭkt, -jĕkt′)
n.
1. A specific, individual, material entity, especially one that is not living or not sentient.
2.
a. A focus of attention, feeling, thought, or action: a product that was so bad it became an object of derision.
b. A limiting factor that must be considered: Since money is no object, let's eat at that fancy place.
3. The purpose, aim, or goal of a specific action or effort: the object of the game. See Synonyms at intention.
4. Grammar
a. A noun, pronoun, or noun phrase that receives or is affected by the action of a verb within a sentence.
b. A noun or substantive governed by a preposition and typically following it.
5. Philosophy Something intelligible to or perceptible by the mind.
6. Computers
a. A discrete item than can be selected and maneuvered, such as an onscreen graphic.
b. In object-oriented programming, a structure that combines data and the procedures necessary to operate on that data.
v. (əb-jĕkt′) ob·ject·ed, ob·ject·ing, ob·jects
v. intr.
1. To present a dissenting or opposing argument; raise an objection: objected to the testimony of the witness.
2. To be averse to or express disapproval of something: objects to modern materialism.
v. tr.
To put forward in or as a reason for opposition; offer as criticism: They objected that discipline was lacking.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin obiectum, thing put before the mind, from neuter past participle of Latin obicere, to put before, hinder : ob-, before, toward; see ob- + iacere, to throw; see yē- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots. V., from Middle English obiecten, from Old French objecter, from Latin obiectāre, frequentative of obicere.]

ob·jec′tor n.
Synonyms: object, protest, demur, remonstrate, expostulate
These verbs mean to express opposition to something, usually by presenting arguments against it. Object implies the expression of disapproval or distaste: "I took some criticism from Democrats who objected to the tax cut or to the fact that we were making the agreement at all" (Bill Clinton).
Protest suggests strong opposition, usually forthrightly expressed: The manager protested the umpire's decision. To demur is to raise an objection that may delay decision or action: We proposed a revote, but the president demurred. Remonstrate implies the presentation of objections, complaints, or reproof: "The people of Connecticut ... remonstrated against the bill" (George Bancroft).
To expostulate is to express objection in the form of earnest reasoning: The teacher expostulated with them on the foolhardiness of their behavior. See Also Synonyms at intention.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.objector - a person who dissents from some established policyobjector - a person who dissents from some established policy
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
conscientious objector, CO - one who refuses to serve in the armed forces on grounds of conscience
recusant, nonconformist - someone who refuses to conform to established standards of conduct
political dissident - a dissenter from political orthodoxy
NIMBY - someone who objects to siting something in their own neighborhood but does not object to it being sited elsewhere; an acronym for not in my backyard
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

objector

[əbˈdʒektəʳ] Nopositor(a) m/f
see also conscientious
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

objector

[əbˈdʒɛktər] ncontradicteur mobject-oriented [ˌɒbdʒɪktˈɔːriɛntɪd] object-orientated [ˌɒbdʒɪktˈɔːriənteɪtɪd] adj (COMPUTING)orienté(e) objet
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

objector

nGegner(in) m(f) (→ to +gen)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

objector

[əbˈdʒɛktəʳ] noppositore/trice
a conscientious objector → un obiettore di coscienza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
An objector in a large State exclaims loudly against the unreasonable equality of representation in the Senate.
And suppose the objector to refine still further, and to draw the nice distinction that not only parts of tops, but whole tops, when they spin round with their pegs fixed on the spot, are at rest and in motion at the same time (and he may say the same of anything which revolves in the same spot), his objection would not be admitted by us, because in such cases things are not at rest and in motion in the same parts of themselves; we should rather say that they have both an axis and a circumference, and that the axis stands still, for there is no deviation from the perpendicular; and that the circumference goes round.
We give up the past to the objector, and yet we hope.
As far as I have been able to divine the latent meaning of the objectors, it seems to originate in a presupposition that the people will be disinclined to the exercise of federal authority in any matter of an internal nature.
Liberality in the matter of liquor and small loans, reconciled a large proportion of the objectors to their fate; the sulky minority I treated with contempt, and scourged avengingly with the smart lash of caricature.
Thesiger's manner had so much quiet propriety that objectors could only simmer in silence.
Magistrate Maofi further said the objector's argument that Advocate Boko was residing in Tlokweng because they had seen some confidential information from banks and BURS did not hold water, adding that they could have asked him in person before taking the route that they took.
Turkish Cypriot conscientious objector Halil Karapasaoglu was released from prison on Friday after being sent to prison for not paying a 2000 TL (EUR 360) fine imposed by a military court in the north of Cyprus for refusing to participate in reservist duties.
Turkish Cypriot conscientious objector Halil Karapasiaoglou, 33, was arrested and taken to prison in the north on Tuesday after refusing to pay a fine imposed earlier in January by a military court.
First, Rule 23(e)(5)(A) now requires that any objection to a settlement by a class member must state with particularity whether the objection applies "only to the objector, to a specific subset of the class, or to the entire class, and also state with specificity the grounds for the objection."
objector This included many objectors doing so on political grounds with the majority being members of the independent Labour party, he explained.
However, an objector will have to pay his for his or her own expenses and the fees, costs and expenses of his or her witnesses and attorneys.