oblate


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ob·late 1

 (ŏb′lāt′, ŏ-blāt′)
adj.
1. Having the shape of a spheroid generated by rotating an ellipse about its shorter axis.
2. Having an equatorial diameter greater than the distance between poles; compressed along or flattened at the poles: Planet Earth is an oblate solid.

[Probably New Latin oblātus : Latin ob-, toward; see ob- + Latin (prō)lātus; see prolate.]

ob′late′ly adv.
ob′late′ness n.

ob·late 2

 (ŏb′lāt′)
n.
1. A layperson dedicated to religious life, especially such a layperson who is affiliated with but not a member of a monastic order.
2. Oblate Roman Catholic Church A member of one of various religious communities whose members are bound by less stringent vows than those required of monastic orders.

[Medieval Latin oblātus, from Latin, past participle of offerre, to offer; see offer.]

oblate

(ˈɒbleɪt)
adj
(Mathematics) having an equatorial diameter of greater length than the polar diameter: the earth is an oblate sphere. Compare prolate
[C18: from New Latin oblātus lengthened, from Latin ob- towards + lātus, past participle of ferre to bring]
ˈoblately adv

oblate

(ˈɒbleɪt)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a person dedicated to a monastic or religious life
[C19: from French oblat, from Medieval Latin oblātus, from Latin offerre to offer]

ob•late1

(ˈɒb leɪt, ɒˈbleɪt)

adj.
flattened at the poles, as a spheroid generated by the revolution of an ellipse about its shorter axis (opposed to prolate).
[1695–1705; < New Latin oblātus lengthened = Latin ob- ob- + (prō)lātus prolate]
ob′late•ly, adv.

ob•late2

(ˈɒb leɪt, ɒˈbleɪt)

n.
a person serving and living in a monastery but not under monastic rule or full monastic vows.
[1860–65; < Medieval Latin oblātus, Latin: offered, past participle of offerre to offer]

oblate

, prolate - Oblate means "flattened at the poles," and the opposite is prolate; the Earth is an oblate spheroid.
See also related terms for poles.

oblate

a person resident and serving in a monastery but not under vows; a lay religious worker.
See also: Catholicism

oblate

Describes a planetary shape in which the equatorial distance is greater than the distance between the poles. The Earth is an oblate planet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oblate - a lay person dedicated to religious work or the religious life
religious person - a person who manifests devotion to a deity
Adj.1.oblate - having the equatorial diameter greater than the polar diameter; being flattened at the poles
rounded - curving and somewhat round in shape rather than jagged; "low rounded hills"; "rounded shoulders"
prolate, watermelon-shaped - having the polar diameter greater than the equatorial diameter; "a prolate spheroid is generated by revolving an ellipse about its major axis"
Translations
oblate

oblate

1
adj (Math) → abgeplattet

oblate

2
n (Eccl) → Oblate m
References in classic literature ?
They were just a trifle too far away for her to see them distinctly in the waning light of the dying day, but she knew that they were too large, they were out of proportion to the perfectly proportioned bodies, and they were oblate in form.
I consider Hildegard to be the patron saint of my becoming an oblate. She opened the door for me into this contemplative way of life that so resonated with who I was and how I longed to pray.
Pastolero said the victims, in civilian clothes and off-duty, were heading to the city proper together on a motorcycle, when gunmen shot them at the corner of Gonzalo Javier Street and Oblate Drive.
Fr Guckian lived with the Oblate Order based in Inchicore, Dublin.
The decision came from conversations with the board of directors and the Oblate Sisters of Providence, who operate the school, said Deacon B.
Oblate and Anglican clergy were both guilty of deception, sabotage, and the planting of malicious rumours about each other's failings.
The Zenlens scleral lenses are available in diameters of 16mm and 17mm, prolate and oblate designs, and are accompanied by a 28 lens diagnostic set, B+L confirmed.
Foran challenges the orthodox notion that Oblate commentators simply discovered and described a singular, empirically existing, and readily identifiable Metis population.
The more round and oblate "modem" tomatoes were not available until after the Civil War.
Coomassie brilliant blue G-250 was used as a model drug to evaluate the drug release behaviors of the spheric and oblate alginate particles, and subsequently a comparison on the release behaviors is made between the gastric and intestinal cases.