oblation

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ob·la·tion

 (ə-blā′shən, ō-blā′-)
n.
1. The act of offering something, such as worship or thanks, to a deity.
2. Oblation
a. The act of offering the bread and wine of the Eucharist.
b. Something offered, especially the bread and wine of the Eucharist.
3. A charitable offering or gift.

[Middle English oblacioun, from Old French oblacion, from Late Latin oblātiō, oblātiōn-, from Latin oblātus, past participle of offerre, to offer : ob-, ob- + lātus, brought; see telə- in Indo-European roots.]

ob·la′tion·al, ob′la·to′ry (ŏb′lə-tôr′ē) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

oblation

(ɒˈbleɪʃən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the offering of the bread and wine of the Eucharist to God
2. any offering made for religious or charitable purposes
[C15: from Church Latin oblātiō; see oblate2]
oblatory, obˈlational adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ob•la•tion

(ɒˈbleɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an offering made to a deity, esp. the offering of bread and wine in the celebration of the Eucharist.
2. the act of making such an offering.
3. any offering for religious or charitable uses.
[1375–1425; < Late Latin oblātiō=oblā-, suppletive s. of offerre to offer + -tiō -tion]
ob•la•to•ry (ˈɒb ləˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) ob•la′tion•al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

oblation

- Something offered to God or a god, like a sacrifice or donation, can be called an oblation.
See also related terms for sacrifice.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

oblation

1. a religious offering, either as charity or to God or a god.
2. the Eucharist, especially the offering of bread and wine to God.
See also: Christianity
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oblation - the act of contributing to the funds of a church or charity; "oblations for aid to the poor"
giving, gift - the act of giving
2.oblation - the act of offering the bread and wine of the EucharistOblation - the act of offering the bread and wine of the Eucharist
religious ceremony, religious ritual - a ceremony having religious meaning
Offertory - the part of the Eucharist when bread and wine are offered to God
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

oblation

noun
1. A presentation made to a deity as an act of worship:
2. A charitable deed:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

oblation

ʊˈbleɪʃən] N (Rel) → oblación f; (= offering) → oblata f, ofrenda f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

oblation

n (Eccl) → Opfergabe f, → Opfer nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
(32) The sign was large and clear (L'enseigne fu apert' e grant 820): compare Christina of Markyate who marks a cross on the church door of St Albans and next day offers an oblatory penny at the altar before dedicating herself to Christ (Talbot 40-41).
Consisting of traditional narratives (ossoran) and long lists of oblatory practices (aluk), this truth was often portrayed as being in danger of disappearing.
The humor and intelligence of this tale demonstrate repeatedly that desire is most narcissistic when the subject intends it to be oblatory; the object represents to the subject nothing more than an image of its demand.