anaerobe

(redirected from obligate anaerobes)
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Related to obligate anaerobes: Facultative anaerobes, Methanogens

an·aer·obe

 (ăn′ə-rōb′, ăn-âr′ōb′)
n.
An organism, such as a bacterium, that can live in the absence of free oxygen.

anaerobe

(æˈnɛərəʊb; ˈænərəʊb) or

anaerobium

n, pl -obes or -obia (-ˈəʊbɪə)
(Biology) an organism that does not require oxygen for respiration. Compare aerobe

an•aer•obe

(ˈæn əˌroʊb, ænˈɛər oʊb)

n.
an organism, esp. a bacterium, that does not require air or free oxygen to live (opposed to aerobe).
[1875–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anaerobe - an organism (especially a bacterium) that does not require air or free oxygen to liveanaerobe - an organism (especially a bacterium) that does not require air or free oxygen to live
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
obligate anaerobe - an organism that cannot grow in the presence of oxygen
Translations

anaerobe

[ænˈɛərəʊb] anaerobium aenɛəˈrəʊbɪəm] n (anaerobia (pl)) [ˌænɛəˈrəʊbɪə]anaerobio

an·aer·obe

n. anaerobio, microorganismo que se multiplica en ausencia de aire u oxígeno.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent research from Belgium using an animal model has identified that butyrate directly influences colonocyte oxygen consumption through the beta-oxidation pathway leading to a symbiotic effect in normal gut by maintaining obligate anaerobes rather than facultative anaerobes such as pathogenic Escherichia and Salmonella by limiting the availability of oxygen in the gut, Additionally; gut nitrate is essential for facultative anaerobes, which is formed via nitric oxide synthase 2.
A combination of enriched, selective, non-selective plating media were used for the primary isolation and presumptive identification of obligate anaerobes from the clinical material.
They are ubiquitous, coccoid, Gram-positive, obligate anaerobes and were first documented in the human gastrointestinal tract (GOODSIR, 1842).
This covers pathogenic obligate anaerobes, whose growth is favored in an environment with a higher pH.
Organisms within Firmicutes are obligate anaerobes and include numerous butyrate producers, whose presence is thought to improve health since colonocytes use butyrate as a primary energy source.