obliteration


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Related to obliteration: relinquish, devastated, elusive, earnest, vindication

o·blit·er·ate

 (ə-blĭt′ə-rāt′, ō-blĭt′-)
tr.v. o·blit·er·at·ed, o·blit·er·at·ing, o·blit·er·ates
1. To remove or destroy completely so as to leave no trace. See Synonyms at annihilate.
2. To render invisible or unreadable, as by erasing or marking over: "The name [on the door] had been crudely obliterated with thick, heavy strokes of black paint" (F. Paul Wilson).
3. Medicine To remove completely (a body organ or part), as by surgery, disease, or radiation.

[Latin oblitterāre, oblitterāt-, to erase, from ob litterās (scrībere), (to write) over letters (ob, over; see ob- + litterās, accusative pl. of littera, letter) and from oblītus, past participle of oblīvīscī, to forget; see oblivion.]

o·blit′er·a′tion n.
o·blit′er·a′tive (-ə-rā′tĭv, -ər-ə-tĭv) adj.
o·blit′er·a′tor n.

obliteration

A method of completely removing tissue, especially by surgery or radiation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.obliteration - destruction by annihilating somethingobliteration - destruction by annihilating something
destruction, devastation - the termination of something by causing so much damage to it that it cannot be repaired or no longer exists
atomisation, atomization - annihilation by reducing something to atoms
pulverisation, pulverization - annihilation by pulverizing something
vaporization, vaporisation - annihilation by vaporizing something
2.obliteration - the complete destruction of every trace of something
demolition, wipeout, destruction - an event (or the result of an event) that completely destroys something

obliteration

obliteration

noun
2. The act of erasing or the condition of being erased:
Translations

obliteration

[əˌblɪtəˈreɪʃən] N
1. (= destruction) → arrasamiento m, destrucción f
2. (= occlusion) → eliminación f

obliteration

nAuslöschen nt; (inf: of opponent) → Vernichtung f; (= hiding)Verdecken nt

ob·lit·er·a·tion

n. obliteración, destrucción; oclusión por degeneración o por cirugía.
References in classic literature ?
Selfridge Merry bore across the room to join them, and it became clear to Archer that here also a conspiracy of rehabilitation and obliteration was going on.
And it is a remarkable example of the confusion into which the present age has fallen; of the obliteration of landmarks, the opening of floodgates, and the uprooting of distinctions," says Sir Leicester with stately gloom, "that I have been informed by Mr.
Not a cousin of the batch but is amazed to hear from Sir Leicester at breakfast-time of the obliteration of landmarks, and opening of floodgates, and cracking of the framework of society, manifested through Mrs.
So he stood, crossing and prostrating himself when necessary, and struggled with himself, now giving way to cold condemnation and now to a consciously evoked obliteration of thought and feeling.
Therefore I do not doubt that little folds of skin, which originally served as ovigerous frena, but which, likewise, very slightly aided the act of respiration, have been gradually converted by natural selection into branchiae, simply through an increase in their size and the obliteration of their adhesive glands.
Thus have we traced the history of these great rings of coral-rock, from their first origin through their normal changes, and through the occasional accidents of their existence, to their death and final obliteration.
Also by consisting entirely of praise, the kaddish obliterates the dead as thoroughly as life has done by going on without them; it is that obliteration that we acknowledge and reinforce when we (still alive: why?
Thus began an ambitious program of road obliteration that will ultimately reduce the road network from 2,200 miles to about 700.
Absorption, alignment, subjugation, dependency, colonialism, globalization, enslavement, extermination, annihilation, obliteration, and genocide.
The Nazis' obliteration of Germany's thriving gay movement sends a warning that reverberates through the cautious organizing of the '50s, the psychedelic explosion of freedom in the '60s and '70s, and the angry street activism--often tied to AIDS--of the '80s and '90s.
At a minimum, the body should be glue fumed at the scene to preserve the prints and help prevent contamination or obliteration of prints when the body is moved.
In many ways this book works against the obliteration of black history, imaged in an early essay by the freeway whose construction destroyed the L.