obloquy

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ob·lo·quy

 (ŏb′lə-kwē)
n. pl. ob·lo·quies
1. Abusively detractive language or utterance; calumny: "I have had enough obloquy for one lifetime" (Anthony Eden).
2. The condition of disgrace suffered as a result of abuse or vilification; ill repute.

[Middle English obloqui, from Late Latin obloquium, abusive contradiction, from Latin obloquī, to interrupt : ob-, against; see ob- + loquī, to speak; see tolkw- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

obloquy

(ˈɒbləkwɪ)
n, pl -quies
1. defamatory or censorious statements, esp when directed against one person
2. disgrace brought about by public abuse
[C15: from Latin obloquium contradiction, from ob- against + loquī to speak]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ob•lo•quy

(ˈɒb lə kwi)

n., pl. -quies.
1. censure, blame, or abusive language.
2. discredit, disgrace, or bad repute.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin obloquium contradiction]
ob•lo•qui•al (ɒˈbloʊ kwi əl) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.obloquy - state of disgrace resulting from public abuse
disgrace, ignominy, shame - a state of dishonor; "one mistake brought shame to all his family"; "suffered the ignominy of being sent to prison"
2.obloquy - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actionsobloquy - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actions
depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
assassination, blackwash, character assassination - an attack intended to ruin someone's reputation
malignment, smear, vilification - slanderous defamation
libel - a false and malicious publication printed for the purpose of defaming a living person
slander - words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
name calling, names - verbal abuse; a crude substitute for argument; "sticks and stones may break my bones but names can never hurt me"
epithet, name - a defamatory or abusive word or phrase
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

obloquy

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

obloquy

[ˈɒbləkwɪ] N (frm) (= abuse) → injurias fpl, calumnia f; (= shame) → deshonra f
to cover sb with obloquyllenar a algn de injurias
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

obloquy

n (liter)
(= blame, abuse)Schmähung f (liter), → Beschimpfung f
(= disgrace)Schande f, → Schmach f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Canst thou with impious obloquie condemne The just Decree of God, pronounc't and sworn, That to his only Son by right endu'd With Regal Scepter, every Soule in Heav'n Shall bend the knee, and in that honour due Confess him rightful King?
As a Looking-glasse dooth imitate, whatsoever is sit before it, and dooth represent the likenesses of them that looke in it, but by a contrary way, for it sheweth the left side to be the right; and if thou looke into the East, it doth represent thee, looking towards the West: Even so a Flatterer in voice and in gesture, will imitate thee: If thou laugh and be merrie, he also will be pleasant and merrie: If thou weepe, he will weepe for companie: If thou wilt backbite and slaunder a man, he will take thy part; and will, with raylings, obloquies and slaunders, even grievously wound the same man.
Here at last we see Amis at rest: oldish, sentimental, content, the expected skewerings and obloquies still present but no longer essential to the proceedings.