oboe da caccia


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oboe da caccia

(də ˈkætʃə)
n
(Instruments) a member of the oboe family; the predecessor of the cor anglais
[Italian: hunting oboe]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oboe da caccia - an alto oboe; precursor of the English horn
hautbois, hautboy, oboe - a slender double-reed instrument; a woodwind with a conical bore and a double-reed mouthpiece
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sound is lovely, but I wonder how many choral societies around the land will be able to summon up an oboe da caccia? Amid the well-chosen array of poetic texts there is perhaps too much emphasis on the indignation of actually being born (coincidentally on the day I read of someone in India suing his parents for forcing him into the world), but there is also a sense of Finzi's Intimations of Immortality; and Tippett's ideal of communal involvement is never very far away, too.
The Bach Festival now is a member in good standing of the Early Music Movement, rendering Bach's works with period instruments such as the viola da gamba, theorbo, oboe da caccia and wooden flute.
(10) For example, in BWV 65 playing in the upper octave places the horns between the oboe da caccia and flute, rather than doubling oboes.
At Leipzig, oboe da caccia, horns, flutes, and violoncello appear exclusively, while timpani, viola d'amore, and viola da gamba are unique to his Weimar cantatas.
The oboe d'amore and oboe da caccia had only just been copied and skill in the playing of these instruments was gained by the challenge of the Telefunken recordings, with a very stimulating result.
The wooden baroque flutes were perfect for the shepherd's pastoral music alongside the mellow oboe da caccia. Jeffrey Skidmore conducted with his usual quiet authority.