obscurely


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ob·scure

 (ŏb-skyo͝or′, əb-)
adj. ob·scur·er, ob·scur·est
1. Deficient in light; dark: the obscure depths of a cave.
2.
a. So faintly perceptible as to lack clear delineation; indistinct: an obscure figure in the fog.
b. Indistinctly heard; faint.
c. Linguistics Having the reduced, neutral sound represented by schwa (ə).
3.
a. Far from centers of human population: an obscure village.
b. Out of sight; hidden: an obscure retreat.
4. Not readily noticed or seen; inconspicuous: an obscure flaw.
5. Of undistinguished or humble station or reputation: an obscure poet; an obscure family.
6. Not clearly understood or expressed; ambiguous or vague: Some say that Blake's style is obscure and complex. See Synonyms at ambiguous.
tr.v. ob·scured, ob·scur·ing, ob·scures
1. To make dim, indistinct, or impossible to see: "His face was obscured in shadow" (Rosemary Mahoney). See Synonyms at block.
2. To make difficult to discern mentally or understand: The meaning of the text was obscured by its difficult language.
3. To diminish the stature of; overshadow or detract from: "[His] character was so repellent that it has obscured his historical role" (David Rains Wallace).
4. Linguistics To reduce (a vowel) to the neutral sound represented by schwa (ə).
n.
Something obscure or unknown.

[Middle English, from Old French obscur, from Latin obscūrus; see (s)keu- in Indo-European roots.]

ob·scure′ly adv.
ob·scure′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.obscurely - in an obscure manner; "this work is obscurely written"
Translations
بِغُموض
óljóst, ógreinilega
anlaşılmaz bir şekilde

obscurely

[əbˈskjʊəlɪ] ADV
1. (= out of the public eye) [live, die] → en la oscuridad
2. (= cryptically) [describe] → de forma poco clara; [argue, write] → de manera que confunde; [refer, say] → de forma críptica

obscurely

adv
written, presented, argued, rememberundeutlich, unklar
a movement which began obscurely in the depths of Russiaeine Bewegung mit obskuren Anfängen im tiefsten Russland
litschwach

obscurely

[əbˈskjʊəlɪ] advin modo oscuro

obscure

(əbˈskjuə) adjective
1. not clear; difficult to see. an obscure corner of the library.
2. not well-known. an obscure author.
3. difficult to understand. an obscure poem.
verb
to make obscure. A large tree obscured the view.
obˈscurely adverb
obˈscurity noun
References in classic literature ?
With his own ghostly hand, the obscurely seen, but majestic, figure had imparted to me the scarlet symbol and the little roll of explanatory manuscript.
To some the general interest in the White Whale was now wildly heightened by a circumstance of the Town-Ho's story, which seemed obscurely to involve with the whale a certain wondrous, inverted visitation of one of those so called judgments of God which at times are said to overtake some men.
Another reason which Sag-Harbor (he went by that name) urged for his want of faith in this matter of the prophet, was something obscurely in reference to his incarcerated body and the whale's gastric juices.
As it spoke, I discerned, obscurely, a child's face looking through the window.
Ere long, however, there rose obscurely on her mind a doubt which perplexed and distressed her.
As I passed the church, I felt (as I had felt during service in the morning) a sublime compassion for the poor creatures who were destined to go there, Sunday after Sunday, all their lives through, and to lie obscurely at last among the low green mounds.
So long as visible or audible pain turns you sick; so long as your own pains drive you; so long as pain underlies your propositions about sin,--so long, I tell you, you are an animal, thinking a little less obscurely what an animal feels.
He must be retained, or rather he must be left quite alone; and Milady but obscurely perceived the means which could lead to this result.
Then, compelled to quit Rome, he went and got himself obscurely killed in a night skirmish, scarcely noticed in history.
Sir Edmund Andros looked at the old man; then he cast his hard and cruel eye over the multitude, and beheld them burning with that lurid wrath, so difficult to kindle or to quench; and again he fixed his gaze on the aged form, which stood obscurely in an open space, where neither friend nor foe had thrust himself.
Yearning desire had been transformed to hope; and hope, long cherished, had become like certainty, that, obscurely as he journeyed now, a glory was to beam on all his pathway- though not, perhaps, while he was treading it.
The four blazing pines threw up a loftier flame, and obscurely discovered shapes and visages of horror on the smoke wreaths above the impious assembly.