obstinacy


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ob·sti·na·cy

 (ŏb′stə-nə-sē)
n. pl. ob·sti·na·cies
1. The state or quality of being stubborn or refractory.
2. The act or an instance of being stubborn or refractory.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

obstinacy

(ˈɒbstɪnəsɪ) or

obstinateness

n, pl -cies
1. the state or quality of being obstinate
2. an obstinate act, attitude, etc. Also (rare): pervicacity or pervicacy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ob•sti•na•cy

(ˈɒb stə nə si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. the quality or state of being obstinate; stubbornness.
2. an instance of being obstinate; an obstinate act, viewpoint, etc.
[1350–1400]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Obstinacy

 of buffaloes: a herd—Hare, 1939.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Obstinacy

 

deaf as an adder Obstinate refusal to listen; stubborn unwillingness to pay attention. The origin of this phrase lies in ancient Oriental folklore. An adder was thought to protect itself against the music of a snake charmer by blocking one ear with its tail while pressing the other ear to the ground. This belief was mentioned in the Old Testament of the Bible:

They are like the deaf adder that stoppeth her ear
Which will not hearken to the voice of charmers, charming never so wisely.
(Psalms 58:4-5)

Picturesque Expressions: A Thematic Dictionary, 1st Edition. © 1980 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.obstinacy - the trait of being difficult to handle or overcomeobstinacy - the trait of being difficult to handle or overcome
intractability, intractableness - the trait of being hard to influence or control
2.obstinacy - resolute adherence to your own ideas or desiresobstinacy - resolute adherence to your own ideas or desires
firmness of purpose, resoluteness, resolve, firmness, resolution - the trait of being resolute; "his resoluteness carried him through the battle"; "it was his unshakeable resolution to finish the work"
impenitence, impenitency - the trait of refusing to repent
intransigence, intransigency - the trait of being intransigent; stubbornly refusing to compromise
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

obstinacy

noun stubbornness, persistence, tenacity, perseverance, resolution, intransigence, firmness, single-mindedness, inflexibility, obduracy, doggedness, relentlessness, wilfulness, resoluteness, pig-headedness, pertinacity, tenaciousness, mulishness the obstinacy typical of his thoroughly awkward nature
flexibility, compliance, meekness, submissiveness, docility, cooperativeness, tractability
Quotations
"Obstinacy in a bad cause, is but constancy in a good" [Thomas Browne Religio Medici]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

obstinacy

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
عَنادَه
stædighed
csökönyösségönfejűség
òrjóska
trma
inatçılık

obstinacy

[ˈɒbstɪnəsɪ] N [of person] → obstinación f, terquedad f; [of resistance] → tenacidad f; [of illness] → persistencia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

obstinacy

[ˈɒbstɪnəsi] nobstination f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

obstinacy

n
(of person)Hartnäckigkeit f, → Starrsinn m; his obstinacy in doing somethingdie Hartnäckigkeit, mit der er etw tut
(of illness, resistance)Hartnäckigkeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

obstinacy

[ˈɒbstɪnəsɪ] nostinazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

obstinate

(ˈobstinət) adjective
refusing to yield, obey etc. She won't change her mind – she's very obstinate.
ˈobstinacy (-nəsi) noun
ˈobstinately adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"For you it's a matter of obstinacy," she said, watching him intently and suddenly finding the right word for that expression that irritated her, "simply obstinacy.
Altho' I cannot agree with you in supposing that I shall never again be exposed to Misfortunes as unmerited as those I have already experienced, yet to avoid the imputation of Obstinacy or ill-nature, I will gratify the curiosity of your daughter; and may the fortitude with which I have suffered the many afflictions of my past Life, prove to her a useful lesson for the support of those which may befall her in her own.
Nicholl, disgusted by this obstinacy, tried to tempt Barbicane by offering him every chance.
'Then I do,' said Sikes, more in the spirit of obstinacy than because he had any real objection to the girl going where she listed.
For her part, she could not help thinking it was an encouragement to vice; but that she knew too much of the obstinacy of mankind to oppose any of their ridiculous humours."
Bogdanich is vindictive and you'll pay for your obstinacy," said Kirsten.
"I can't say I do," answered Horace, in the positive tone of a man whose obstinacy is proof against every form of appeal that can be addressed to him.
I believe I should have yielded at once if I had known, from the beginning, how much resistance would have cost me; but now, for very obstinacy's sake, I will stand out!'
Nobody could bargain with greater obstinacy, and as for cleanliness, the lustre on her brass sauce-pans was the envy and despair of other servants.
The popular type and exponent of obstinacy is the mule, a most intelligent animal.
All the obstinacy and defiance of his nature, driven out of their old channel, found a vent for themselves in the immediate formation of plans by which he would meet his difficulties, and remain Mr.
I wonder who first picked out a mule as the type of obstinacy? How little knowledge that man must have had of women!