obtrusion


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ob·trude

 (ŏb-tro͞od′, əb-)
v. ob·trud·ed, ob·trud·ing, ob·trudes
v.tr.
1. To impose (oneself or one's ideas) on others with undue insistence or without invitation.
2. To thrust out; push forward.
v.intr.
To impose oneself on others.

[Latin obtrūdere : ob-, against; see ob- + trūdere, to thrust; see treud- in Indo-European roots.]

ob·trud′er n.
ob·tru′sion (-tro͞o′zhən) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

obtrusion

noun
1. The act or an instance of interfering or intruding:
2. An advance beyond proper or legal limits:
Translations

obtrusion

[əbˈtruːʒən] N (= imposition) [of opinions] → imposición f; (= interference, intrusion) → entrometimiento m, importunidad f

obtrusion

n
Aufdrängen nt; because of this obtrusion of himself/his ideas upon othersweil er sich/seine Ideen anderen aufdrängen will
(= pushing out)Hervorstrecken nt
(= sticking out)Herausragen nt
References in classic literature ?
To do it in ANY way was an act of violence, for what did it consist of but the obtrusion of the idea of grossness and guilt on a small helpless creature who had been for me a revelation of the possibilities of beautiful intercourse?
Even to call life "activity," or to define it further as "the continuous adjustment of internal relations to external relations," as Spencer has it, Nietzsche characterises as a "democratic idiosyncracy." He says to define it in this way, "is to mistake the true nature and function of life, which is Will to Power...Life is ESSENTIALLY appropriation, injury, conquest of the strange and weak, suppression, severity, obtrusion of its own forms, incorporation and at least, putting it mildest, exploitation." Adaptation is merely a secondary activity, a mere re- activity (see Note on Chapter LVII.).
This was the obtrusion on my mind of the mental process going forward in first one person, and then another, with whom I happened to be in contact: the vagrant, frivolous ideas and emotions of some uninteresting acquaintance--Mrs.
Wilson felt at once the harmony of beautiful things that have lived long together without obtrusions of ugliness or change.
He sees me suffering under the condescending attentions and prosaic discourses of the one, and the repulsive obtrusions of the other, without so much as a shadow of commiseration for me, or resentment against my tormentors.
masculine anxieties about the obtrusion of women into previously
Refugee identities are also characterized by a combination of fluidity and obtrusion, a combination that ideally culminates in an "identity stabilization." (50) Labels, on the other hand, are the culmination of socio-political power that produces and sustains categorizations or groupings of people.
As Garrett Stewart proposes, 'the death scene inscribes an inevitable rehearsal of closure not only as inherent sense of limit but as ever-nearing end, the point where all utterance dissipates again to the fund of silence from which it comes.' (14) The scene of death marks the obtrusion of the unnarratable into the narrative space.
In press statements, Al Jaz noted that the meeting concluded with a recommendation to conduct a detailed study on the gold through the companies in the country and the obtrusion on the spaces specified for its work.
Obtrusion into an individual's privacy regarding taking the HPV vaccine whether voluntary or compulsory.
This could come as a bummer and an obtrusion for a lot of users.
However, the clear managerial strategy does not mean the obtrusion of certain tactical ways.