occasionalism


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Related to occasionalism: Double aspect theory

oc·ca·sion·al·ism

 (ə-kā′zhə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
The doctrine that God is the sole causal actor and that all events are merely occasions on which God brings about what are normally thought of as their effects.

occasionalism

(əˈkeɪʒənəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the post-Cartesian theory that the seeming interconnection of mind and matter is effected by God

occasionalism

the Cartesian philosophic doctrine that holds that mind and matter are incapable of affecting each other and that their reciprocal action must be owing to the intervention of God. — occasionalist, n.occasionalistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
References in periodicals archive ?
My own view, however, is that Descartes may not have had a determinate position on the issue of the causality of bodies, and that it is only our knowledge of the subsequent development of Cartesian metaphysics in the direction of occasionalism that leads us to suppose that this issue must have come into sharp focus for him.
These methods may, however, be inadequate to distinguish between interactionism, on the one hand, and occasionalism, parallelism, or some other alternative to interactionism on the other.
NAZIF MUHATAROGLU, "The Islamic and Cartesian Roots of Occasionalism." Adviser: Brandon Look.
In System of Efficient Causes and Philosophical Treatise on the Immaterial Nature of the Soul, Knutzen rejects pre-established harmony and occasionalism, defending 'physical influx' in their place.
Chapter five consists of a short survey of causality and occasionalism in falsafa and kalam respectively, thus selling the stage for al-Ghazali's own elaborations on the subject.
Here, his geometrical arguments for atomism are presented along with an explanation as to why the mutakallimun as a whole, even until today, are so committed to atomism and occasionalism.
Even here there is little genuine agreement, for Leibniz recasts the metaphysics underlying the correlation in terms of pre-established harmony rather than causation or occasionalism.
(2) A less moderate, potentially theologically radical position is occasionalism, originally Islamic but most notably proclaimed in the early modern period by the Christian Cartesian, Malebranche: "[N]atural causes are not true causes; they are only occasional causes that act only through the [immediate] force and efficacy of the will of God." (3) As Dan Garber describes it in reference to the world of bodies, occasionalism is the doctrine that:
In the 335 years since the publication of the first volumes of The Search After Truth, in which Malebranche first affirmed both occasionalism and human free will, most of Malebranche's readers have concluded that he is not entitled to both.
Occasionalism is for Ibn Abi Jumhur no longer an essential part of the mutakallimun's cosmology.
Unwittingly, in their drive to assert God's sole agency, the occasionalism that Ash ari discourse erected as a counter to causation served to undermine knowledge of God that can be gained through knowledge of 'causal relations'.
ANDREW PLATT, "The Rise of Cartesian Occasionalism." Adviser: Eileen O'Neill.