occlusive

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oc·clu·sive

 (ə-klo͞o′sĭv, -zĭv)
adj.
Occluding or tending to occlude.
n. Linguistics
An oral or nasal stop.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

occlusive

(əˈkluːsɪv)
adj
of or relating to the act of occlusion
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics an occlusive speech sound
ocˈclusiveness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.occlusive - a consonant produced by stopping the flow of air at some point and suddenly releasing it; "his stop consonants are too aspirated"
obstruent - a consonant that is produced with a partial or complete blockage of the airflow from the lungs through the nose or mouth
implosion - the initial occluded phase of a stop consonant
plosion, explosion - the terminal forced release of pressure built up during the occlusive phase of a stop consonant
labial stop - a stop consonant that is produced with the lips
glottal catch, glottal plosive, glottal stop - a stop consonant articulated by releasing pressure at the glottis; as in the sudden onset of a vowel
suction stop, click - a stop consonant made by the suction of air into the mouth (as in Bantu)
Adj.1.occlusive - tending to occlude
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

occlusive

[ɒˈkluːsɪv]
A. ADJoclusivo
B. Noclusiva f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

occlusive

adj oclusivo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to a number of individual characteristics (perspiration, sebum production, hair growth, moles, adhesions, etc.), it may be challenging to maintain complete occlusiveness of the dressing for any period of time.
Standard occlusive patches are cut open at two ends, or "breathable" adhesive tapes are created by modifying the occlusiveness to a non-occlusive or semi-permeable exposure condition.