occultation


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oc·cul·ta·tion

 (ŏk′ŭl-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of occulting or the state of being occulted.
2. Astronomy
a. The passage of a celestial object across the line of sight between an observer and another celestial object, as when the moon moves between Earth and the sun in a solar eclipse.
b. The progressive blocking and unblocking of light or other electromagnetic radiation from a celestial source during such a passage: a lunar occultation of a quasar; a planetary occultation of a star.
c. An observational technique for determining the position or radiant structure of a celestial source undergoing such occultation or of the object causing the occultation.
3. Islam The temporary, supernatural removal of a holy person from visible existence, as Shiites believe is the case with the 12th imam.

[Middle English occultacion, from Latin occultātiō, occultātiōn-, from occultātus, past participle of occultāre, frequentative of occulere, to conceal; see occult.]

occultation

(ˌɒkʌlˈteɪʃən)
n
1. (Astronomy) the temporary disappearance of one celestial body as it moves out of sight behind another body
2. the act of occulting or the state of being occulted

oc•cul•ta•tion

(ˌɒk ʌlˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the passage of one celestial body in front of another, thus hiding the other from view: applied esp. to the moon's coming between an observer and a star or planet.
2. the act of blocking or hiding from view.
3. the resulting hidden or concealed state.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin occultātiō concealment]

oc·cul·ta·tion

(ŏk′ŭl-tā′shən)
The passage of a celestial object between an observer and another celestial object, blocking the second object from view. An occultation occurs when the moon moves between Earth and the sun in a solar eclipse.

occultation

- One of its meanings is "the disappearance from view of a star or planet in the sun's rays after sunset or before sunrise, when the star or planet is above the horizon."
See also related terms for sunset.

occultation

the process of one heavenly body disappearing behind another as viewed by an observer.
See also: Astronomy, Planets
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.occultation - one celestial body obscures anotheroccultation - one celestial body obscures another
egress, emersion - (astronomy) the reappearance of a celestial body after an eclipse
ingress, immersion - (astronomy) the disappearance of a celestial body prior to an eclipse
break, interruption - some abrupt occurrence that interrupts an ongoing activity; "the telephone is an annoying interruption"; "there was a break in the action when a player was hurt"
solar eclipse - the moon interrupts light from the sun
lunar eclipse - the earth interrupts light shining on the moon
total eclipse - an eclipse as seen from a place where the eclipsed body is completely obscured
partial eclipse - an eclipse in which the eclipsed body is only partially obscured
Translations
References in classic literature ?
(and it could not have been insignificant), its period of occultation continued.
The broad occultation path covers the southern half of North America and all of Central America, but for those in the west, this is an evening twilight event.
This phenomenon is known as stellar occultation, and a large team of astronomers and researchers are preparing their telescopes and cameras for those days.
Occasionally, an asteroid may move in front of a star as seen from Earth, an event known as an occultation. Such an event is of great interest since the size and shape of the asteroid can then be measured.
Figure 1 shows the zone of the partial occultation in the British Isles.
Such occultation measurements provide a way of sensing the atmosphere's temperature.
4 If you'd like to learn how to time asteroid occultations, start by downloading the free ebook Chasing the Shadow: The IOTA Occultation Observer's Manual from Derek Breit's occultation page (poyntsource.com/IOTAmanual).
Contract notice: Framework agreement for purchase orders for maintenance and repairs following disasters in Carpentry, Locksmithing, Occultation, broken down into 4 lots.
The most amazing view of the occultation will be from parts of north and northeastern U.S.
* (5038) Overbeek: Named for Michiel Daniel Overbeek (1920 Sep 15-2001 Jul 19), prolific variable star & occultation observer, ASSA President (1961 & 1999) and Gill Medalist (1984).
Three observers recorded the star disappear briefly for a few seconds, and then reappear, while one recorded a near-miss (no occultation).
The authors cite observations of the star's occultation made by other researchers from the University of Tasmania Observatory in Hobart, Australia, and from NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory.