octosyllable


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

oc·to·syl·la·ble

 (ŏk′tə-sĭl′ə-bəl)
n.
1. also oc·to·syl·lab·ic (ŏk′tō-sĭ-lăb′ĭk)
a. A line of verse containing eight syllables.
b. A poem having eight syllables in each line.
2. A word of eight syllables.

oc′to·syl·lab′ic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

octosyllable

(ˈɒktəˌsɪləbəl)
n
1. (Poetry) a line of verse composed of eight syllables
2. a word of eight syllables
octosyllabic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

oc•to•syl•la•ble

(ˈɒk təˌsɪl ə bəl)

n.
a word or line of verse of eight syllables.
[1765–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.octosyllable - a verse line having eight syllables or a poem of octosyllabic lines
verse line, verse - a line of metrical text
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
osmerac

octosyllable

[ˈɒktəʊˈsɪləbl] Noctosílabo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Correspondingly, the lines oscillate between the pair and the impair, the well-formed (5//5 decasyllable [first and fourth lines], 3>5 octosyllable [fifth line]) and the indeterminate.
The varying stanzaic patterns, which reflect the push-and-pull movement of the sea (increasing from the octosyllable to the alexandrine, then decreasing back to the octosyllable), reflect this hesitation formally; if the epic poem and the ghosts of Roman poets are evoked, they ultimately disappear ("plus de trace" 82).
It seems unlikely that Borges presented "Los compadritos muertos" to Piazzolla since it features hendecasyllable verses, not the characteristic octosyllable versification of these tangos and milongas.
(10.) According to my work on rococo meter, the alexandrine, decasyllable and octosyllable combination is a favorite in rococo heterometrical poetry (Nell-Boelsche 243).
In addition to the decimas, Rivera de Alvarez (1983) describes other types of oral expressions used in Puerto Rico, such as the romances and romancillos (short narratives or lyrical poems in octosyllable meters), coplas (ballads), cantos (songs), rimas infantiles (nursery rhymes), refranes (proverbs), adivinanzas (riddles), and cuentos (folktales) (pp.
In Orchard's opinion, Aldhelm and his contemporary AEthilwald pioneered this type of verse, and Orchard thinks that alliteration in Old English poetry influenced the octosyllable, especially in AEthilwald's verses, e.g.
53), and on the basis of other witnesses can be amended to the perfect octosyllable 'non contrastes a las gentes' or 'e non contrastes las gentes'.
Turner's primary theme is luck, but in offering a more structured sense of how things work he remembers Hamlet, beautifully adapting Shakespeare's famous pentameters into the lively octosyllables of a pub recital:
Although the feminine rimes in this extract sometimes alternate with masculine rimes in the way one would expect of later French verse, the effect is ephemeral; there is in fact no discernable pattern to the alternation of masculine and feminine rimes, octosyllables and heptasyllables, in the larger text.